Inverse solar sail trajectory problem

C.R. McInnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SOLAR sailing has long been considered for a diverse range of future mission applications. Although low-performance solar sails can be utilized for interplanetary transfer using heliocentric spiral trajectories, high-performance solar sails can enable exotic applications using non-Keplerian orbits. A simple example of such an exotic applicationis "levitation,"with the solar radiationpressure accelerationexperiencedby the sail exactly balancing solar gravity. Such a static equilibrium allows the solar sail to remain stationary with respect to the sun, or indeed if the sail is turned edgewise to the sun it will fall sunwards on a rectilinear trajectory. Although this static equilibrium is simple to identify, the question of transfer to it from an Earth escape trajectory remains open. This Note will derive an analytic sail steering law that allows the solar sail is be maneuvered from a circular heliocentric orbit, to a static equilibrium location at the same heliocentric distance. The required trajectory will be deŽ ned a priori with the resulting sail steering law derived from the equations of motion. An inverse trajectory problem is, therefore, being solved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-371
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

ice ridge
trajectory
Trajectories
trajectories
Trajectory
Solar sails
solar sails
Sun
sun
Orbits
solar orbits
Orbit
levitation
circular orbits
Equations of motion
escape
Gravitation
equations of motion
Balancing
Earth (planet)

Keywords

  • solar sails
  • guidance systems
  • space travel
  • astronautical engineering

Cite this

McInnes, C.R. / Inverse solar sail trajectory problem. In: Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics. 2003 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 369-371.
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McInnes, CR 2003, 'Inverse solar sail trajectory problem', Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 369-371.

Inverse solar sail trajectory problem. / McInnes, C.R.

In: Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, Vol. 26, No. 2, 2003, p. 369-371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - McInnes, C.R.

PY - 2003

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KW - guidance systems

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