Introduction: Evidence and evaluation in social policy

Ian Greener, Bent Greve

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    What counts as evidence in social policy, and how evidence does, or perhaps more often, does not, influence policy-making, have become central questions in the last 20 years. The evidence-based medicine movement gathered momentum in the 1980s and 1990s (Sackett et al. 1997), creating a framework for the assessment of research in that field and how it might led to a more robust basis for clinical decision-making, and even health policy. This led to policymakers, especially the New Labour government in the UK, suggesting that the ideological and interest-based politics of the past were now to be jettisoned in favour of an approach that was based instead on a pragmatic, ‘what works’ basis instead (Davies et al. 1999).
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages355-358
    Number of pages4
    JournalSocial Policy and Administration
    Volume47
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2013

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    health policy
    social policy
    policy making
    medicine
    momentum
    politics
    labor
    decision making
    evaluation
    evidence
    New Labour
    pragmatics
    Social Policy

    Keywords

    • social policy
    • policy making
    • policy makers

    Cite this

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    Introduction : Evidence and evaluation in social policy. / Greener, Ian; Greve, Bent.

    In: Social Policy and Administration, Vol. 47, No. 4, 31.08.2013, p. 355-358.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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