Intestinal microbiota of 6-week-old infants across Europe: geographic influence beyond delivery mode, breast-feeding, and antibiotics

M. Fallani, D. Young, J. Scott, E. Norin, S. Amarri, R. Adam, M. Aguilera, S. Khanna, A. Gil, C.A. Edwards, J. Dore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: There are many differences in diet and lifestyle across Europe that may influence the development of the infant gut microbiota. This work aimed to assess the impact of geographic area, mode of delivery, feeding method, and antibiotic treatment on the fecal microbiota of infants from 5 European countries with different lifestyle characteristics: Sweden, Scotland, Germany, Italy, and Spain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fecal samples from 606 infants (age 6 weeks) recruited within the European project INFABIO were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with flow cytometry using a panel of 10 rRNA targeted group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes. Information on factors potentially affecting gut microbiota composition was collected with questionnaires and associations were evaluated with multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The Bifidobacterium genus was predominant (40% average proportion of total detectable bacteria), followed by Bacteroides (11.4%) and enterobacteria (7.5%). Northern European countries were associated with higher proportions of bifidobacteria in infant feces, whereas a more diverse microbiota with more bacteroides characterized southern countries. Bifidobacteria dominated the microbiota of breast-fed infants, whereas formula-fed babies had significantly higher proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus groups. Newborns delivered by cesarean section or from mothers treated with antibiotics perinatally had lower proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Atopobium cluster. CONCLUSIONS: Delivery mode and feeding method influenced the fecal microbiota of European infants at 6 weeks, as expected, but the effect of country of birth was more pronounced, with dominant bifidobacteria in northern countries and greater early diversification in southern European countries
LanguageEnglish
Pages77-84
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

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Bacteroides
Bifidobacterium
Microbiota
Breast Feeding
Feeding Methods
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Life Style
Infant Formula
Clostridium
Oligonucleotide Probes
Scotland
Lactobacillus
Enterobacteriaceae
Child Development
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Sweden
Feces
Cesarean Section
Spain
Italy

Keywords

  • 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA 16S rRNA probes AGE allergy ASSOCIATION ASSOCIATIONS BACTERIAL-COLONIZATION BIRTH BOTTLE-FED INFANTS CARE Development Diet FECAL MICROBIOTA flow cytometry FLOW-CYTOMETRY FLUORESCENT fluorescent in situ hybridization FORMULA-FED INFANTS geography Human HUMAN FECES HYBRIDIZATION IMPACT IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION INFANT infant fecal microbiota infant feeding INFANTS MOTHERS nutrition OBJECTIVES PATIENT patients pediatrics PROBES PROJECT REAL-TIME PCR Scotland SWEDEN TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES Treatment TRENDS

Cite this

Fallani, M. ; Young, D. ; Scott, J. ; Norin, E. ; Amarri, S. ; Adam, R. ; Aguilera, M. ; Khanna, S. ; Gil, A. ; Edwards, C.A. ; Dore, J. / Intestinal microbiota of 6-week-old infants across Europe: geographic influence beyond delivery mode, breast-feeding, and antibiotics. In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition . 2010 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 77-84.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: There are many differences in diet and lifestyle across Europe that may influence the development of the infant gut microbiota. This work aimed to assess the impact of geographic area, mode of delivery, feeding method, and antibiotic treatment on the fecal microbiota of infants from 5 European countries with different lifestyle characteristics: Sweden, Scotland, Germany, Italy, and Spain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fecal samples from 606 infants (age 6 weeks) recruited within the European project INFABIO were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with flow cytometry using a panel of 10 rRNA targeted group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes. Information on factors potentially affecting gut microbiota composition was collected with questionnaires and associations were evaluated with multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The Bifidobacterium genus was predominant (40{\%} average proportion of total detectable bacteria), followed by Bacteroides (11.4{\%}) and enterobacteria (7.5{\%}). Northern European countries were associated with higher proportions of bifidobacteria in infant feces, whereas a more diverse microbiota with more bacteroides characterized southern countries. Bifidobacteria dominated the microbiota of breast-fed infants, whereas formula-fed babies had significantly higher proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus groups. Newborns delivered by cesarean section or from mothers treated with antibiotics perinatally had lower proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Atopobium cluster. CONCLUSIONS: Delivery mode and feeding method influenced the fecal microbiota of European infants at 6 weeks, as expected, but the effect of country of birth was more pronounced, with dominant bifidobacteria in northern countries and greater early diversification in southern European countries",
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Intestinal microbiota of 6-week-old infants across Europe: geographic influence beyond delivery mode, breast-feeding, and antibiotics. / Fallani, M.; Young, D.; Scott, J.; Norin, E.; Amarri, S.; Adam, R.; Aguilera, M.; Khanna, S.; Gil, A.; Edwards, C.A.; Dore, J.

In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition , Vol. 51, No. 1, 07.2010, p. 77-84.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Intestinal microbiota of 6-week-old infants across Europe: geographic influence beyond delivery mode, breast-feeding, and antibiotics

AU - Fallani, M.

AU - Young, D.

AU - Scott, J.

AU - Norin, E.

AU - Amarri, S.

AU - Adam, R.

AU - Aguilera, M.

AU - Khanna, S.

AU - Gil, A.

AU - Edwards, C.A.

AU - Dore, J.

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

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AB - OBJECTIVES: There are many differences in diet and lifestyle across Europe that may influence the development of the infant gut microbiota. This work aimed to assess the impact of geographic area, mode of delivery, feeding method, and antibiotic treatment on the fecal microbiota of infants from 5 European countries with different lifestyle characteristics: Sweden, Scotland, Germany, Italy, and Spain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fecal samples from 606 infants (age 6 weeks) recruited within the European project INFABIO were analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization combined with flow cytometry using a panel of 10 rRNA targeted group- and species-specific oligonucleotide probes. Information on factors potentially affecting gut microbiota composition was collected with questionnaires and associations were evaluated with multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The Bifidobacterium genus was predominant (40% average proportion of total detectable bacteria), followed by Bacteroides (11.4%) and enterobacteria (7.5%). Northern European countries were associated with higher proportions of bifidobacteria in infant feces, whereas a more diverse microbiota with more bacteroides characterized southern countries. Bifidobacteria dominated the microbiota of breast-fed infants, whereas formula-fed babies had significantly higher proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Clostridium coccoides and Lactobacillus groups. Newborns delivered by cesarean section or from mothers treated with antibiotics perinatally had lower proportions of Bacteroides and members of the Atopobium cluster. CONCLUSIONS: Delivery mode and feeding method influenced the fecal microbiota of European infants at 6 weeks, as expected, but the effect of country of birth was more pronounced, with dominant bifidobacteria in northern countries and greater early diversification in southern European countries

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