Interaction of personality traits with social deprivation in determining mental wellbeing and health behaviours

Chris J. Packard, Jonathan Cavanagh, Jennifer S. McLean, Alex McConnachie, Claudia Martina Messow, G. David Batty, Harry Burns, Kevin A. Deans, Naveed Sattar, Paul G. Shiels, Yoga N. Velupillai, Carol Tannahill, Keith Millar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Associations between personality traits, mental wellbeing and good health behaviours were examined to understand further the social and psychological context of the health divide. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 666 subjects recruited from areas of high and low socioeconomic deprivation had personality traits and mental wellbeing assessed, and lifestyle behaviours quantified. Regression models (using deprivation as a moderating variable) assessed the extent to which personality traits and mental wellbeing predicted health behaviour. Results: Deprived (vs. affluent) subjects exhibited similar levels of extraversion but higher levels of neuroticism and psychoticism, more hopelessness, less sense of coherence, lower self-esteem and lower self-efficacy (all P< 0.001). They ate less fruit and vegetables, smoked more and took less aerobic exercise (all P< 0.001). In the deprived group, personality traits were significantly more important predictors of mental wellbeing than in the least deprived group (P< 0.01 for interaction), and mental wellbeing and extraversion appeared more strongly related to good health behaviours. Conclusions: Persistence of a social divide in health may be related to interactions between personality, mental wellbeing and the adoption of good health behaviours in deprived areas. Effectiveness of health messages may be enhanced by accommodating the variation in the levels of extraversion, neuroticism, hopelessness and sense of coherence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-624
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Public Health (United Kingdom)
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Health Behavior
Personality
Mental Health
Sense of Coherence
Health
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
Vegetables
Life Style
Fruit
Cross-Sectional Studies
Sociological Factors
Exercise
Psychology
Extraversion (Psychology)
Neuroticism

Keywords

  • deprivation
  • health behaviours
  • mental wellbeing
  • personality traits
  • socioeconomic status

Cite this

Packard, C. J., Cavanagh, J., McLean, J. S., McConnachie, A., Messow, C. M., Batty, G. D., ... Millar, K. (2012). Interaction of personality traits with social deprivation in determining mental wellbeing and health behaviours. Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom), 34(4), 615-624. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fds030
Packard, Chris J. ; Cavanagh, Jonathan ; McLean, Jennifer S. ; McConnachie, Alex ; Messow, Claudia Martina ; Batty, G. David ; Burns, Harry ; Deans, Kevin A. ; Sattar, Naveed ; Shiels, Paul G. ; Velupillai, Yoga N. ; Tannahill, Carol ; Millar, Keith. / Interaction of personality traits with social deprivation in determining mental wellbeing and health behaviours. In: Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom). 2012 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 615-624.
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Packard, CJ, Cavanagh, J, McLean, JS, McConnachie, A, Messow, CM, Batty, GD, Burns, H, Deans, KA, Sattar, N, Shiels, PG, Velupillai, YN, Tannahill, C & Millar, K 2012, 'Interaction of personality traits with social deprivation in determining mental wellbeing and health behaviours', Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom), vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 615-624. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fds030

Interaction of personality traits with social deprivation in determining mental wellbeing and health behaviours. / Packard, Chris J.; Cavanagh, Jonathan; McLean, Jennifer S.; McConnachie, Alex; Messow, Claudia Martina; Batty, G. David; Burns, Harry; Deans, Kevin A.; Sattar, Naveed; Shiels, Paul G.; Velupillai, Yoga N.; Tannahill, Carol; Millar, Keith.

In: Journal of Public Health (United Kingdom), Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.12.2012, p. 615-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Cavanagh, Jonathan

AU - McLean, Jennifer S.

AU - McConnachie, Alex

AU - Messow, Claudia Martina

AU - Batty, G. David

AU - Burns, Harry

AU - Deans, Kevin A.

AU - Sattar, Naveed

AU - Shiels, Paul G.

AU - Velupillai, Yoga N.

AU - Tannahill, Carol

AU - Millar, Keith

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N2 - Background: Associations between personality traits, mental wellbeing and good health behaviours were examined to understand further the social and psychological context of the health divide. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 666 subjects recruited from areas of high and low socioeconomic deprivation had personality traits and mental wellbeing assessed, and lifestyle behaviours quantified. Regression models (using deprivation as a moderating variable) assessed the extent to which personality traits and mental wellbeing predicted health behaviour. Results: Deprived (vs. affluent) subjects exhibited similar levels of extraversion but higher levels of neuroticism and psychoticism, more hopelessness, less sense of coherence, lower self-esteem and lower self-efficacy (all P< 0.001). They ate less fruit and vegetables, smoked more and took less aerobic exercise (all P< 0.001). In the deprived group, personality traits were significantly more important predictors of mental wellbeing than in the least deprived group (P< 0.01 for interaction), and mental wellbeing and extraversion appeared more strongly related to good health behaviours. Conclusions: Persistence of a social divide in health may be related to interactions between personality, mental wellbeing and the adoption of good health behaviours in deprived areas. Effectiveness of health messages may be enhanced by accommodating the variation in the levels of extraversion, neuroticism, hopelessness and sense of coherence.

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