Influence of work–welfare cycling and labour market segmentation on employment histories of young long-term unemployed

Alexander McTier, Alan McGregor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The onset of the 'Great Recession' from 2008 was associated with a significant increase in long-term unemployment among young people. Work–welfare cycling has been put forward as a contributory factor. Drawing on a large-scale survey of long-term unemployed young people, this article argues that segmented labour market theory provides a strong explanatory framework for understanding the nature of long-term unemployment among young people, with the literature on work–welfare cycling contributing to an understanding of one of the processes by which precarious employment impacts on employability and labour supply. A second key finding is the heterogeneous nature of the young long-term unemployed, which in turn requires policy responses more customized to the needs of the different groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-37
Number of pages18
JournalWork, Employment and Society
Volume32
Issue number1
Early online date3 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • segmented labour markets
  • work–welfare cycling
  • youth unemployment

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