Inactivation of Campylobacter jejuni by exposure to high-intensity 405-nm visible light

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Abstract

Although considerable research has been carried out on a range of environmental factors that impact on the survival of Campylobacter jejuni, there is limited information on the effects of violet/blue light on this pathogen. This investigation was carried out to determine the effects of high-intensity 405-nm light on C. jejuni and to compare this with the effects on two other important Gram-negative enteric pathogens, Salmonella enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-intensity 405-nm light generated from an array of 405-nm light-emitting diodes was used to inactivate the test bacteria. The results demonstrated that while all three tested species were susceptible to 405-nm light inactivation, C. jejuni was by far the most sensitive organism, requiring a total dose of 18J cm−2 of 405-nm light to achieve a 5-log10 reduction. This study has established that C. jejuni is particularly susceptible to violet/blue light at a wavelength of 405nm. This finding, coupled with the safety-in-use advantages of this visible (non-ultraviolet wavelength) light, suggests that high-intensity 405-nm light may have applications for control of C. jejuni contamination levels in situations where this type of illumination can be effectively applied.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1211-1216
Number of pages6
JournalFoodborne Pathogens and Disease
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

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Campylobacter jejuni
inactivation
Light
Viola
blue light
wavelengths
pathogens
Salmonella Enteritidis
Escherichia coli O157
Salmonella enteritidis
lighting
Lighting
environmental factors
bacteria
organisms
Bacteria
dosage
Safety

Keywords

  • Campylobacter jejuni
  • exposure
  • high-intensity light
  • 405-nm visible light

Cite this

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abstract = "Although considerable research has been carried out on a range of environmental factors that impact on the survival of Campylobacter jejuni, there is limited information on the effects of violet/blue light on this pathogen. This investigation was carried out to determine the effects of high-intensity 405-nm light on C. jejuni and to compare this with the effects on two other important Gram-negative enteric pathogens, Salmonella enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-intensity 405-nm light generated from an array of 405-nm light-emitting diodes was used to inactivate the test bacteria. The results demonstrated that while all three tested species were susceptible to 405-nm light inactivation, C. jejuni was by far the most sensitive organism, requiring a total dose of 18J cm−2 of 405-nm light to achieve a 5-log10 reduction. This study has established that C. jejuni is particularly susceptible to violet/blue light at a wavelength of 405nm. This finding, coupled with the safety-in-use advantages of this visible (non-ultraviolet wavelength) light, suggests that high-intensity 405-nm light may have applications for control of C. jejuni contamination levels in situations where this type of illumination can be effectively applied.",
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AU - Anderson, J.G.

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AB - Although considerable research has been carried out on a range of environmental factors that impact on the survival of Campylobacter jejuni, there is limited information on the effects of violet/blue light on this pathogen. This investigation was carried out to determine the effects of high-intensity 405-nm light on C. jejuni and to compare this with the effects on two other important Gram-negative enteric pathogens, Salmonella enteritidis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-intensity 405-nm light generated from an array of 405-nm light-emitting diodes was used to inactivate the test bacteria. The results demonstrated that while all three tested species were susceptible to 405-nm light inactivation, C. jejuni was by far the most sensitive organism, requiring a total dose of 18J cm−2 of 405-nm light to achieve a 5-log10 reduction. This study has established that C. jejuni is particularly susceptible to violet/blue light at a wavelength of 405nm. This finding, coupled with the safety-in-use advantages of this visible (non-ultraviolet wavelength) light, suggests that high-intensity 405-nm light may have applications for control of C. jejuni contamination levels in situations where this type of illumination can be effectively applied.

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