In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint

Magnus Kjartan Gislason, David Nash

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

A small number of cadaveric studies have been carried out looking at the force transmission through the radiocarpal joint. Pressure sensitive films have been placed at the joint to estimate the contact stresses under loading of the wrist [Tencer 1988]. Measurements using pressure sensitive films are difficult to quantify and the invasive procedure of placing the films could potentially perturb the joints. Tencer et al reported average contact pressure of 3.2 MPa, with the cadaveric wrist loaded with a compressive load of 103 N. Computational studies have also addressed this issue. In 2003 Carrigan et al created a finite
element model of the wrist and reported contact stresses of 2.6 MPa at the distal end of the radius. The loading was 15 N compressive loading acting
on the capitate. Under loading the wrist can take up large amount of force with values around 2 times bodyweight travelling through the joints [Chadwick & Nicol 2000]. In this study subject specific finite element models were created of the whole wrist joint using measured biomechanical data to capture the forces acting on the wrist with the hand generating a maximum gripping force.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jul 2008
Event16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics - Lucerne, Switzerland
Duration: 6 Jul 20089 Jul 2008

Conference

Conference16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics
CountrySwitzerland
CityLucerne
Period6/07/089/07/08

Fingerprint

Wrist Joint
Wrist
Joints
Finite element method
Pressure
Pressure measurement
Hand

Keywords

  • radiocarpal joints
  • finite element method
  • wrist joint

Cite this

Gislason, M. K., & Nash, D. (2008). In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint. Paper presented at 16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics, Lucerne, Switzerland.
Gislason, Magnus Kjartan ; Nash, David. / In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint. Paper presented at 16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics, Lucerne, Switzerland.1 p.
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Gislason, MK & Nash, D 2008, 'In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint' Paper presented at 16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics, Lucerne, Switzerland, 6/07/08 - 9/07/08, .

In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint. / Gislason, Magnus Kjartan; Nash, David.

2008. Paper presented at 16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics, Lucerne, Switzerland.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint

AU - Gislason, Magnus Kjartan

AU - Nash, David

PY - 2008/7/6

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N2 - A small number of cadaveric studies have been carried out looking at the force transmission through the radiocarpal joint. Pressure sensitive films have been placed at the joint to estimate the contact stresses under loading of the wrist [Tencer 1988]. Measurements using pressure sensitive films are difficult to quantify and the invasive procedure of placing the films could potentially perturb the joints. Tencer et al reported average contact pressure of 3.2 MPa, with the cadaveric wrist loaded with a compressive load of 103 N. Computational studies have also addressed this issue. In 2003 Carrigan et al created a finiteelement model of the wrist and reported contact stresses of 2.6 MPa at the distal end of the radius. The loading was 15 N compressive loading actingon the capitate. Under loading the wrist can take up large amount of force with values around 2 times bodyweight travelling through the joints [Chadwick & Nicol 2000]. In this study subject specific finite element models were created of the whole wrist joint using measured biomechanical data to capture the forces acting on the wrist with the hand generating a maximum gripping force.

AB - A small number of cadaveric studies have been carried out looking at the force transmission through the radiocarpal joint. Pressure sensitive films have been placed at the joint to estimate the contact stresses under loading of the wrist [Tencer 1988]. Measurements using pressure sensitive films are difficult to quantify and the invasive procedure of placing the films could potentially perturb the joints. Tencer et al reported average contact pressure of 3.2 MPa, with the cadaveric wrist loaded with a compressive load of 103 N. Computational studies have also addressed this issue. In 2003 Carrigan et al created a finiteelement model of the wrist and reported contact stresses of 2.6 MPa at the distal end of the radius. The loading was 15 N compressive loading actingon the capitate. Under loading the wrist can take up large amount of force with values around 2 times bodyweight travelling through the joints [Chadwick & Nicol 2000]. In this study subject specific finite element models were created of the whole wrist joint using measured biomechanical data to capture the forces acting on the wrist with the hand generating a maximum gripping force.

KW - radiocarpal joints

KW - finite element method

KW - wrist joint

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Gislason MK, Nash D. In vivo contact stresses at the radiocarpal joint using a finite element method of the complete wrist joint. 2008. Paper presented at 16th Congress of the European Society of Biomechanics, Lucerne, Switzerland.