In situ monitoring of the seed stage of a fermentation process using non-invasive NIR spectrometry

A. Nordon, D. Littlejohn, A.S. Dann, P.A. Jeffkins, M.D. Richardson, S.L. Stimpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-invasive NIR spectrometry has been used to monitor in situ the seed stage of a streptomyces fermentation process. The main spectral change occurred at 7263 cm-1 in the 1st derivative spectrum, and from comparison with off-line NIR spectra acquired of components present in the fermentation broth, can be attributed to biomass. The biomass signal was constant for the first 20 h of the seed stage, after which it decreased before increasing again. The time at which the minimum occurred in the NIR profile was either the same or slightly earlier than that at which a maximum in the carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) occurred. The changes observed for the biomass signal in the NIR spectra can be attributed to growth and then fragmentation of mycelia, which indicates a change in metabolic activity. Hence, it may be possible to use NIR spectrometry in situ to determine the optimum transfer time for the seed stage of a fermentation process. Spectra were also acquired of the final stage of the same fermentation process. The variation in the biomass signal in the NIR spectra was more complicated in the final stage owing to changes in stir rate, and biomass concentration and morphology.
LanguageEnglish
Pages660-666
Number of pages6
JournalAnalyst
Volume133
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Biomass
Fermentation
Spectrometry
fermentation
spectrometry
Seed
Spectrum Analysis
Seeds
seed
Monitoring
biomass
monitoring
Mycelium
Streptomyces
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon dioxide
fragmentation
carbon dioxide
in situ
Derivatives

Keywords

  • streptomyces fermentation
  • NIR spectrometry
  • in situ monitoring
  • biomass

Cite this

Nordon, A. ; Littlejohn, D. ; Dann, A.S. ; Jeffkins, P.A. ; Richardson, M.D. ; Stimpson, S.L. / In situ monitoring of the seed stage of a fermentation process using non-invasive NIR spectrometry. In: Analyst. 2008 ; Vol. 133, No. 5. pp. 660-666.
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In situ monitoring of the seed stage of a fermentation process using non-invasive NIR spectrometry. / Nordon, A.; Littlejohn, D.; Dann, A.S.; Jeffkins, P.A.; Richardson, M.D.; Stimpson, S.L.

In: Analyst, Vol. 133, No. 5, 2008, p. 660-666.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - In situ monitoring of the seed stage of a fermentation process using non-invasive NIR spectrometry

AU - Nordon, A.

AU - Littlejohn, D.

AU - Dann, A.S.

AU - Jeffkins, P.A.

AU - Richardson, M.D.

AU - Stimpson, S.L.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

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AB - Non-invasive NIR spectrometry has been used to monitor in situ the seed stage of a streptomyces fermentation process. The main spectral change occurred at 7263 cm-1 in the 1st derivative spectrum, and from comparison with off-line NIR spectra acquired of components present in the fermentation broth, can be attributed to biomass. The biomass signal was constant for the first 20 h of the seed stage, after which it decreased before increasing again. The time at which the minimum occurred in the NIR profile was either the same or slightly earlier than that at which a maximum in the carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER) occurred. The changes observed for the biomass signal in the NIR spectra can be attributed to growth and then fragmentation of mycelia, which indicates a change in metabolic activity. Hence, it may be possible to use NIR spectrometry in situ to determine the optimum transfer time for the seed stage of a fermentation process. Spectra were also acquired of the final stage of the same fermentation process. The variation in the biomass signal in the NIR spectra was more complicated in the final stage owing to changes in stir rate, and biomass concentration and morphology.

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KW - in situ monitoring

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