I know where you live: electronic monitoring and penal policy in England and Wales 1999-2004

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Electronic monitoring (EM) in England and Wales remains surprisingly understudied and undertheorised. Given the strength of New Labour’s commitment to it, heightened in the recent Correctional Services Review, coupled with moves towards the increased use of surveillance in criminal justice, it is not unreasonable to think that EM technologies will one day become a normal and dominant feature of community supervision. This paper reviews recent policy developments regarding EM and seeks to clarify its exact nature as a penalty, scotching the idea that it is incapacitative in the way that both its supporters and critics have claimed. It explores the increasingly ambivalent place of EM on the tariff and develops a typology of compliance, so as to better understand the difference EM might
    make to community supervision.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)33-59
    Number of pages27
    JournalBritish Journal of Community Justice
    Volume2
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Fingerprint

    electronics
    monitoring
    supervision
    New Labour
    development policy
    community
    surveillance
    critic
    penalty
    typology
    justice
    commitment

    Keywords

    • electronic monitoring
    • penal policy
    • community justice

    Cite this

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    title = "I know where you live: electronic monitoring and penal policy in England and Wales 1999-2004",
    abstract = "Electronic monitoring (EM) in England and Wales remains surprisingly understudied and undertheorised. Given the strength of New Labour’s commitment to it, heightened in the recent Correctional Services Review, coupled with moves towards the increased use of surveillance in criminal justice, it is not unreasonable to think that EM technologies will one day become a normal and dominant feature of community supervision. This paper reviews recent policy developments regarding EM and seeks to clarify its exact nature as a penalty, scotching the idea that it is incapacitative in the way that both its supporters and critics have claimed. It explores the increasingly ambivalent place of EM on the tariff and develops a typology of compliance, so as to better understand the difference EM mightmake to community supervision.",
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    AB - Electronic monitoring (EM) in England and Wales remains surprisingly understudied and undertheorised. Given the strength of New Labour’s commitment to it, heightened in the recent Correctional Services Review, coupled with moves towards the increased use of surveillance in criminal justice, it is not unreasonable to think that EM technologies will one day become a normal and dominant feature of community supervision. This paper reviews recent policy developments regarding EM and seeks to clarify its exact nature as a penalty, scotching the idea that it is incapacitative in the way that both its supporters and critics have claimed. It explores the increasingly ambivalent place of EM on the tariff and develops a typology of compliance, so as to better understand the difference EM mightmake to community supervision.

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