I know what to expect: the impact of prior experience on legal empowerment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increasing legal empowerment is a key objective of governments and justice systems worldwide. Consequently, the impact of judicable events on legal empowerment is a question of some significance. Subjective Legal Empowerment (SLE) is a measure of legal empowerment based on individual perceptions. SLE is based on Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy. In this study, a sample of over 500 respondents from a Dutch legal assistance clinic were asked about their prior experience of legal conflicts, and completed measures of SLE in relation to a range of legal domains. The results show that previous experience of legal problems results in lowered SLE ratings across a range of different domains, regardless of success/completion of these problems, and that experience within specific legal domains results in significantly lowered empowerment ratings for future problems of that nature. The implications for both the measurement methodology and for the future design of legal procedures are examined.
LanguageEnglish
Pages191-205
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Human Development and Capabilities
Volume17
Issue number2
Early online date28 Aug 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2016

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empowerment
experience
legal assistance
rating
legal procedure
self-efficacy
justice
event
methodology

Keywords

  • legal conflicts
  • legal empowerment
  • capabilities
  • capability approach
  • human rights

Cite this

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abstract = "Increasing legal empowerment is a key objective of governments and justice systems worldwide. Consequently, the impact of judicable events on legal empowerment is a question of some significance. Subjective Legal Empowerment (SLE) is a measure of legal empowerment based on individual perceptions. SLE is based on Bandura’s theory of self-efficacy. In this study, a sample of over 500 respondents from a Dutch legal assistance clinic were asked about their prior experience of legal conflicts, and completed measures of SLE in relation to a range of legal domains. The results show that previous experience of legal problems results in lowered SLE ratings across a range of different domains, regardless of success/completion of these problems, and that experience within specific legal domains results in significantly lowered empowerment ratings for future problems of that nature. The implications for both the measurement methodology and for the future design of legal procedures are examined.",
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I know what to expect : the impact of prior experience on legal empowerment. / Porter, Robert.

In: Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Vol. 17, No. 2, 02.04.2016, p. 191-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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