"I have joined the fight, and it's a fight I hope to help win": UG psychology work placements enable and galvanise students to 'make a difference'

Elizabeth Bonnar, Patricia Mooney

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

A report on the future of UG psychology education in the UK (HEA Psychology Network, 2011) recommended that "Departments facilitate placements, community work, and international study" in order to enhance students' employability and their ability to apply psychological knowledge and skills in the real world. In 2017-18, 39 final year Psychology students at University of Strathclyde took an optional credit-bearing work placement module. Students successfully applied (independently) for placements that involved supporting and empowering others (e.g. local women's aid, one-to-one work with people with dementia in NHS wards, working in residential units for young people with autism, and supporting people with mental health issues who are homeless). Participating students commented on the experience as "transformative" and that they felt proud for doing work that "made a difference" to the lives of others. In a published essay, one student wrote, "I started studying psychology to help others but I was never sure how – without the opportunities provided to me by this module I would still be uncertain as graduation looms" (Anonymous, BPS Scotland Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference Magazine, 2018; p.13). Reports from placement organisations noted that they benefited from the students' psychological knowledge and skills, and academic staff have been inspired. Given the size of the UK UG psychology population (~77,000 in 2016-17), we (participating student and staff) argue that providing this population with the opportunity to participate in work placements is beneficial to students, organisations and their clients, universities, and ultimately to wider society in the pursuit of social progress.

Conference

Conference4th Community Psychology Festival
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHertford
Period23/09/1824/09/18

Fingerprint

Students
Psychology
Organizations
Aptitude
Scotland
Autistic Disorder
Population
Dementia
Mental Health
Education
Research

Keywords

  • psychology
  • higher education
  • work placements

Cite this

@conference{e2fe4171dbac413facfa552788973828,
title = "{"}I have joined the fight, and it's a fight I hope to help win{"}: UG psychology work placements enable and galvanise students to 'make a difference'",
abstract = "A report on the future of UG psychology education in the UK (HEA Psychology Network, 2011) recommended that {"}Departments facilitate placements, community work, and international study{"} in order to enhance students' employability and their ability to apply psychological knowledge and skills in the real world. In 2017-18, 39 final year Psychology students at University of Strathclyde took an optional credit-bearing work placement module. Students successfully applied (independently) for placements that involved supporting and empowering others (e.g. local women's aid, one-to-one work with people with dementia in NHS wards, working in residential units for young people with autism, and supporting people with mental health issues who are homeless). Participating students commented on the experience as {"}transformative{"} and that they felt proud for doing work that {"}made a difference{"} to the lives of others. In a published essay, one student wrote, {"}I started studying psychology to help others but I was never sure how – without the opportunities provided to me by this module I would still be uncertain as graduation looms{"} (Anonymous, BPS Scotland Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference Magazine, 2018; p.13). Reports from placement organisations noted that they benefited from the students' psychological knowledge and skills, and academic staff have been inspired. Given the size of the UK UG psychology population (~77,000 in 2016-17), we (participating student and staff) argue that providing this population with the opportunity to participate in work placements is beneficial to students, organisations and their clients, universities, and ultimately to wider society in the pursuit of social progress.",
keywords = "psychology, higher education, work placements",
author = "Elizabeth Bonnar and Patricia Mooney",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "23",
language = "English",
note = "4th Community Psychology Festival ; Conference date: 23-09-2018 Through 24-09-2018",

}

Bonnar, E & Mooney, P 2018, '"I have joined the fight, and it's a fight I hope to help win": UG psychology work placements enable and galvanise students to 'make a difference'' 4th Community Psychology Festival, Hertford, United Kingdom, 23/09/18 - 24/09/18, .

"I have joined the fight, and it's a fight I hope to help win" : UG psychology work placements enable and galvanise students to 'make a difference'. / Bonnar, Elizabeth; Mooney, Patricia .

2018. Abstract from 4th Community Psychology Festival, Hertford, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - "I have joined the fight, and it's a fight I hope to help win"

T2 - UG psychology work placements enable and galvanise students to 'make a difference'

AU - Bonnar, Elizabeth

AU - Mooney, Patricia

PY - 2018/9/23

Y1 - 2018/9/23

N2 - A report on the future of UG psychology education in the UK (HEA Psychology Network, 2011) recommended that "Departments facilitate placements, community work, and international study" in order to enhance students' employability and their ability to apply psychological knowledge and skills in the real world. In 2017-18, 39 final year Psychology students at University of Strathclyde took an optional credit-bearing work placement module. Students successfully applied (independently) for placements that involved supporting and empowering others (e.g. local women's aid, one-to-one work with people with dementia in NHS wards, working in residential units for young people with autism, and supporting people with mental health issues who are homeless). Participating students commented on the experience as "transformative" and that they felt proud for doing work that "made a difference" to the lives of others. In a published essay, one student wrote, "I started studying psychology to help others but I was never sure how – without the opportunities provided to me by this module I would still be uncertain as graduation looms" (Anonymous, BPS Scotland Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference Magazine, 2018; p.13). Reports from placement organisations noted that they benefited from the students' psychological knowledge and skills, and academic staff have been inspired. Given the size of the UK UG psychology population (~77,000 in 2016-17), we (participating student and staff) argue that providing this population with the opportunity to participate in work placements is beneficial to students, organisations and their clients, universities, and ultimately to wider society in the pursuit of social progress.

AB - A report on the future of UG psychology education in the UK (HEA Psychology Network, 2011) recommended that "Departments facilitate placements, community work, and international study" in order to enhance students' employability and their ability to apply psychological knowledge and skills in the real world. In 2017-18, 39 final year Psychology students at University of Strathclyde took an optional credit-bearing work placement module. Students successfully applied (independently) for placements that involved supporting and empowering others (e.g. local women's aid, one-to-one work with people with dementia in NHS wards, working in residential units for young people with autism, and supporting people with mental health issues who are homeless). Participating students commented on the experience as "transformative" and that they felt proud for doing work that "made a difference" to the lives of others. In a published essay, one student wrote, "I started studying psychology to help others but I was never sure how – without the opportunities provided to me by this module I would still be uncertain as graduation looms" (Anonymous, BPS Scotland Undergraduate Psychology Research Conference Magazine, 2018; p.13). Reports from placement organisations noted that they benefited from the students' psychological knowledge and skills, and academic staff have been inspired. Given the size of the UK UG psychology population (~77,000 in 2016-17), we (participating student and staff) argue that providing this population with the opportunity to participate in work placements is beneficial to students, organisations and their clients, universities, and ultimately to wider society in the pursuit of social progress.

KW - psychology

KW - higher education

KW - work placements

M3 - Abstract

ER -