Hypnosis, hypnotic suggestibility, and meditation: an integrative review of the associated brain regions and networks

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Abstract

The number of neuroimaging studies on hypnosis and meditation has multiplied rapidly in recent years. The methods and analytic techniques that are being applied are becoming increasingly sophisticated and approaches focusing on connectomics have offered novel ways to investigate the practices, enabling brain function to be investigated like never before. This chapter provides a review of the literature on the effects of hypnosis and meditation on brain network functional connectivity. Numerous cross-sectional as well as longitudinal studies have also reported enduring transformations in brain structure and function in practitioners of meditation, while evidence is mounting which demonstrates a relationship between hypnotic suggestibility and variations in neuroanatomy/functional connectivity that may facilitate hypnosis. The similarities (and differences) between the brain regions and networks associated with each type of practice are highlighted, while links are tentatively made between these and the reported phenomenology.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHypnosis and Meditation
Subtitle of host publicationTowards an Integrative Science of Conscious Planes
EditorsAmir Raz, Michael Lifshitz
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages343-367
Number of pages25
ISBN (Print)9780198759102
Publication statusPublished - 7 Apr 2016

Keywords

  • neuroimaging
  • hypnosis
  • meditation
  • brain function
  • hypnotic suggestibility

Cite this

McGeown, W. J. (2016). Hypnosis, hypnotic suggestibility, and meditation: an integrative review of the associated brain regions and networks. In A. Raz, & M. Lifshitz (Eds.), Hypnosis and Meditation: Towards an Integrative Science of Conscious Planes (pp. 343-367). Oxford University Press.