Hypervariation and phase variation in the bacteriophage 'resistome'

P. Hoskisson, M.C.M. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most bacteria encode proteins for defence against infection by bacteriophages. The mechanisms that bring about phage defence are extremely diverse, suggesting frequent independent evolution of novel processes. Phage defence determinants are often plasmid or phage-encoded and many that are chromosomal show evidence of lateral transfer. Recent studies on restriction-modification (R-M) systems show that these genes are amongst the most rapidly evolving. Some bacteria have contingency genes that encode alternative target specificity determinants for Type I or Type III R-M systems, thus expanding the range of phages against which the host population is immune. The most counter-intuitive observation, however, is the prevalence of phase variation in many restriction systems, but recent arguments suggest that switching off expression of R-M systems can aid phage defence.
LanguageEnglish
Pages396-400
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Microbiology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

Bacteriophages
DNA Restriction-Modification Enzymes
Bacteria
Genes
Plasmids
Observation
Infection
Population
Proteins

Keywords

  • hypervariation
  • phase variation
  • bacteria
  • biomedical systems

Cite this

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Hypervariation and phase variation in the bacteriophage 'resistome'. / Hoskisson, P.; Smith, M.C.M.

In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 2007, p. 396-400.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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