Humor style similarity and difference in friendship dyads

Simon C. Hunter, Claire L. Fox, Siân E. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
57 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study assessed the concurrent and prospective (fall to spring) associations between four different humor styles to assess the degree to which stable friendships are characterized by similarity, and to assess whether best friends’ humor styles influence each other’s later use of humor. Participants were aged 11-13 years, with 87 stable, reciprocal best friend dyads. Self-report assessments of humor styles were completed on both occasions. Results indicated that there was no initial similarity in dyads’ levels of humor. However, dyads’ use of humor that enhances interpersonal relationships (Affiliative humor) became positively correlated by spring. Additionally, young people’s use of this humor style was positively associated with their best friend’s later use of the same. No such effects were present for humor which was aggressive, denigrating toward the self, or used to enhance the self. These results have clear implications for theories of humor style development, highlighting an important role for Affiliative humor within stable friendship dyads.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-37
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume46
Issue number1
Early online date13 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • humour styles
  • friendship
  • APIM

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  • Projects

    Humour styles and bullying in schools

    Hunter, S. C. & Fox, C.

    ESRC (Economic and Social Research Council)

    1/08/1131/10/12

    Project: Research

    Research Output

    Children's humor types and psychosocial adjustment

    Fox, C. L., Hunter, S. C. & Jones, S. E., 31 Jan 2016, In : Personality and Individual Differences. 89, p. 86-91 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Open Access
    File
  • 9 Citations (Scopus)
    42 Downloads (Pure)

    The relationship between peer victimization and children's humor styles: it's no laughing matter!

    Fox, C. L., Hunter, S. C. & Jones, S. E., 1 Aug 2015, In : Social Development. 24, 3, p. 443-461 18 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Open Access
    File
  • 6 Citations (Scopus)
    73 Downloads (Pure)

    Reciprocity between humor and peer victimization.

    Fox, C., Hunter, S. & Jones, S., 7 Sep 2013.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

  • Activities

    • 4 Types of Public engagement and outreach - Media article or participation

    Live interview on BBC Radio Scotland's 'Good Morning Scotland'

    Simon C. Hunter (Interviewee)
    3 Dec 2015

    Activity: Other activity typesTypes of Public engagement and outreach - Media article or participation

    Report of publication in the Daily Mail Online

    Simon C. Hunter (Interviewee)
    3 Dec 2015

    Activity: Other activity typesTypes of Public engagement and outreach - Media article or participation

    Report of publication in the Metro newspaper

    Simon C. Hunter (Interviewee)
    3 Dec 2015

    Activity: Other activity typesTypes of Public engagement and outreach - Media article or participation

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