"How to use it more?" Self-efficacy and its sources in the use of social media for knowledge sharing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated sources of self-efficacy for researchers and the sources’ impact on the researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing. It is a continuation of a larger study (Alshahrani & Rasmussen Pennington, 2018). The authors distributed an online questionnaire to researchers at the University of Strathclyde (n=144) and analysed the responses using descriptive statistics. Participants relied on personal mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal for social media use. These elements of self-efficacy mostly led them to use it effectively, with a few exceptions. The convenience sample utilised for this study, which included academic staff, researchers, and PhD students at one university, is small and may not be entirely representative of the larger population. This study contributes to the existing literature on social media and knowledge sharing. It can help researchers understand how they can develop their self-efficacy and its sources in order to enhance their online professional presence. Additionally, academic institutions can use these results to inform how they can best encourage and support their researchers in improving their professional social media use. Researchers do rely on their self-efficacy and its sources to use social media for knowledge sharing. These results can help researchers and their institutions eliminate barriers and improve online engagement with colleagues, students, the public, and other relevant research stakeholders.
LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Documentation
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 13 Jul 2019

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social media
self-efficacy
Students
knowledge
Statistics
persuasion
descriptive statistics
experience
student
stakeholder
staff
questionnaire
university

Keywords

  • social media
  • knowledge sharing
  • social cognitive theory
  • self-efficacy

Cite this

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title = "{"}How to use it more?{"} Self-efficacy and its sources in the use of social media for knowledge sharing",
abstract = "This study investigated sources of self-efficacy for researchers and the sources’ impact on the researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing. It is a continuation of a larger study (Alshahrani & Rasmussen Pennington, 2018). The authors distributed an online questionnaire to researchers at the University of Strathclyde (n=144) and analysed the responses using descriptive statistics. Participants relied on personal mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal for social media use. These elements of self-efficacy mostly led them to use it effectively, with a few exceptions. The convenience sample utilised for this study, which included academic staff, researchers, and PhD students at one university, is small and may not be entirely representative of the larger population. This study contributes to the existing literature on social media and knowledge sharing. It can help researchers understand how they can develop their self-efficacy and its sources in order to enhance their online professional presence. Additionally, academic institutions can use these results to inform how they can best encourage and support their researchers in improving their professional social media use. Researchers do rely on their self-efficacy and its sources to use social media for knowledge sharing. These results can help researchers and their institutions eliminate barriers and improve online engagement with colleagues, students, the public, and other relevant research stakeholders.",
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author = "Hussain Alshahrani and {Rasmussen Pennington}, Diane",
year = "2019",
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journal = "Journal of Documentation",
issn = "0022-0418",
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N2 - This study investigated sources of self-efficacy for researchers and the sources’ impact on the researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing. It is a continuation of a larger study (Alshahrani & Rasmussen Pennington, 2018). The authors distributed an online questionnaire to researchers at the University of Strathclyde (n=144) and analysed the responses using descriptive statistics. Participants relied on personal mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal for social media use. These elements of self-efficacy mostly led them to use it effectively, with a few exceptions. The convenience sample utilised for this study, which included academic staff, researchers, and PhD students at one university, is small and may not be entirely representative of the larger population. This study contributes to the existing literature on social media and knowledge sharing. It can help researchers understand how they can develop their self-efficacy and its sources in order to enhance their online professional presence. Additionally, academic institutions can use these results to inform how they can best encourage and support their researchers in improving their professional social media use. Researchers do rely on their self-efficacy and its sources to use social media for knowledge sharing. These results can help researchers and their institutions eliminate barriers and improve online engagement with colleagues, students, the public, and other relevant research stakeholders.

AB - This study investigated sources of self-efficacy for researchers and the sources’ impact on the researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing. It is a continuation of a larger study (Alshahrani & Rasmussen Pennington, 2018). The authors distributed an online questionnaire to researchers at the University of Strathclyde (n=144) and analysed the responses using descriptive statistics. Participants relied on personal mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal for social media use. These elements of self-efficacy mostly led them to use it effectively, with a few exceptions. The convenience sample utilised for this study, which included academic staff, researchers, and PhD students at one university, is small and may not be entirely representative of the larger population. This study contributes to the existing literature on social media and knowledge sharing. It can help researchers understand how they can develop their self-efficacy and its sources in order to enhance their online professional presence. Additionally, academic institutions can use these results to inform how they can best encourage and support their researchers in improving their professional social media use. Researchers do rely on their self-efficacy and its sources to use social media for knowledge sharing. These results can help researchers and their institutions eliminate barriers and improve online engagement with colleagues, students, the public, and other relevant research stakeholders.

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