How Scotland Voted: Economic Perceptions in the Scottish Independence Referendum

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

A lot closer than had seemed likely a few months previously; not as close in the end as the final polls had suggested. That probably summarises many people’s reaction when they learnt that 45% had voted Yes, and 55% No in Scotland’s independence referendum. But Scotland did not vote as one. Voters’ propensities to vote Yes or No varied according to their social and economic circumstances. Not least of the reasons is that those circumstances affected their perceptions of the economic consequences of independence.
LanguageEnglish
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Commissioning bodyInternational Public Policy Institute
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2015

Publication series

NameInternational Public Policy Institute Policy Brief
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde

Fingerprint

referendum
voter
economics

Keywords

  • IPPI
  • Scottish independance
  • Scottish voting
  • Scottish election study

Cite this

Curtice, J. (2015). How Scotland Voted: Economic Perceptions in the Scottish Independence Referendum. (International Public Policy Institute Policy Brief). University of Strathclyde.
Curtice, John. / How Scotland Voted : Economic Perceptions in the Scottish Independence Referendum. University of Strathclyde, 2015. 10 p. (International Public Policy Institute Policy Brief).
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Curtice, J 2015, How Scotland Voted: Economic Perceptions in the Scottish Independence Referendum. International Public Policy Institute Policy Brief, University of Strathclyde.

How Scotland Voted : Economic Perceptions in the Scottish Independence Referendum. / Curtice, John.

University of Strathclyde, 2015. 10 p. (International Public Policy Institute Policy Brief).

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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AB - A lot closer than had seemed likely a few months previously; not as close in the end as the final polls had suggested. That probably summarises many people’s reaction when they learnt that 45% had voted Yes, and 55% No in Scotland’s independence referendum. But Scotland did not vote as one. Voters’ propensities to vote Yes or No varied according to their social and economic circumstances. Not least of the reasons is that those circumstances affected their perceptions of the economic consequences of independence.

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Curtice J. How Scotland Voted: Economic Perceptions in the Scottish Independence Referendum. University of Strathclyde, 2015. 10 p. (International Public Policy Institute Policy Brief).