How quickly do hospital surfaces become contaminated after detergent cleaning?

Alexandra Bogusz, Munro Stewart, Jennifer Hunter, Brigitte Yip, Damien Reid, Chris Robertson, Stephanie J. Dancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hospital cleanliness is important for controlling infection. This study aimed to determine the effect of detergent-based cleaning on microbial load at near-patient sites on one ward over a 48 h period. Lockers, left and right bedrails and overbed tables in 30 bed spaces were screened for aerobic colony counts (ACC) and staphylococci (methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: MSSA/MRSA) before detergent-based cleaning. Sites were rescreened at: 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after cleaning. Microbial growth was quantified as number of ACC/cm2 and presence of MSSA/MRSA at each site. The study was repeated 3 times at monthly intervals. There was a significant reduction in average ACC (360 sites) from a pre-clean level of 6.72 ACC/cm2 to 3.46 ACC/cm2 at 4 hours after detergent-based cleaning (P < 0.0001). Average counts increased to 4.89 ACC/cm2 at 24 h and 5.27 ACC/cm2 at 48 h for all sites. Levels on bed rails and lockers, but not overbed tables, fell below a proposed standard (5 cfu/cm2) for 24 h after cleaning. MSSA/MRSA decreased 2–4 h after cleaning (P = 0.014) before increasing but failed to reach pre-clean levels. Detergent cleaning reduces ACC at near-patient sites on a hospital ward. S. aureus (including MRSA) was not completely eliminated but showed a similar pattern of decrease. Microbial burden at high-risk sites beside the patient could potentially be controlled by daily cleaning with single-use detergent wipes.
LanguageEnglish
Pages3-9
Number of pages7
JournalHealthcare Infection
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2013

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Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Detergents
Methicillin
Staphylococcus
Staphylococcus aureus
Growth
Infection

Keywords

  • cleaning standards
  • detergents
  • environmental contamination
  • hospital cleaning
  • MRSA

Cite this

Bogusz, Alexandra ; Stewart, Munro ; Hunter, Jennifer ; Yip, Brigitte ; Reid, Damien ; Robertson, Chris ; Dancer, Stephanie J. / How quickly do hospital surfaces become contaminated after detergent cleaning?. In: Healthcare Infection. 2013 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 3-9.
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Bogusz, A, Stewart, M, Hunter, J, Yip, B, Reid, D, Robertson, C & Dancer, SJ 2013, 'How quickly do hospital surfaces become contaminated after detergent cleaning?' Healthcare Infection, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 3-9. https://doi.org/10.1071/HI12063

How quickly do hospital surfaces become contaminated after detergent cleaning? / Bogusz, Alexandra; Stewart, Munro; Hunter, Jennifer; Yip, Brigitte; Reid, Damien; Robertson, Chris; Dancer, Stephanie J.

In: Healthcare Infection, Vol. 18, No. 1, 27.02.2013, p. 3-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - How quickly do hospital surfaces become contaminated after detergent cleaning?

AU - Bogusz, Alexandra

AU - Stewart, Munro

AU - Hunter, Jennifer

AU - Yip, Brigitte

AU - Reid, Damien

AU - Robertson, Chris

AU - Dancer, Stephanie J.

PY - 2013/2/27

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N2 - Hospital cleanliness is important for controlling infection. This study aimed to determine the effect of detergent-based cleaning on microbial load at near-patient sites on one ward over a 48 h period. Lockers, left and right bedrails and overbed tables in 30 bed spaces were screened for aerobic colony counts (ACC) and staphylococci (methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: MSSA/MRSA) before detergent-based cleaning. Sites were rescreened at: 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after cleaning. Microbial growth was quantified as number of ACC/cm2 and presence of MSSA/MRSA at each site. The study was repeated 3 times at monthly intervals. There was a significant reduction in average ACC (360 sites) from a pre-clean level of 6.72 ACC/cm2 to 3.46 ACC/cm2 at 4 hours after detergent-based cleaning (P < 0.0001). Average counts increased to 4.89 ACC/cm2 at 24 h and 5.27 ACC/cm2 at 48 h for all sites. Levels on bed rails and lockers, but not overbed tables, fell below a proposed standard (5 cfu/cm2) for 24 h after cleaning. MSSA/MRSA decreased 2–4 h after cleaning (P = 0.014) before increasing but failed to reach pre-clean levels. Detergent cleaning reduces ACC at near-patient sites on a hospital ward. S. aureus (including MRSA) was not completely eliminated but showed a similar pattern of decrease. Microbial burden at high-risk sites beside the patient could potentially be controlled by daily cleaning with single-use detergent wipes.

AB - Hospital cleanliness is important for controlling infection. This study aimed to determine the effect of detergent-based cleaning on microbial load at near-patient sites on one ward over a 48 h period. Lockers, left and right bedrails and overbed tables in 30 bed spaces were screened for aerobic colony counts (ACC) and staphylococci (methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: MSSA/MRSA) before detergent-based cleaning. Sites were rescreened at: 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after cleaning. Microbial growth was quantified as number of ACC/cm2 and presence of MSSA/MRSA at each site. The study was repeated 3 times at monthly intervals. There was a significant reduction in average ACC (360 sites) from a pre-clean level of 6.72 ACC/cm2 to 3.46 ACC/cm2 at 4 hours after detergent-based cleaning (P < 0.0001). Average counts increased to 4.89 ACC/cm2 at 24 h and 5.27 ACC/cm2 at 48 h for all sites. Levels on bed rails and lockers, but not overbed tables, fell below a proposed standard (5 cfu/cm2) for 24 h after cleaning. MSSA/MRSA decreased 2–4 h after cleaning (P = 0.014) before increasing but failed to reach pre-clean levels. Detergent cleaning reduces ACC at near-patient sites on a hospital ward. S. aureus (including MRSA) was not completely eliminated but showed a similar pattern of decrease. Microbial burden at high-risk sites beside the patient could potentially be controlled by daily cleaning with single-use detergent wipes.

KW - cleaning standards

KW - detergents

KW - environmental contamination

KW - hospital cleaning

KW - MRSA

U2 - 10.1071/HI12063

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SN - 1835-5617

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