How do women scientists perceive their own career development?

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Examines the applicability of current career theory to women scientists. Data were collected from a group of New Zealand women scientists and interpreted using the Concept Mapping technique which produces a two-dimensional visual map of the participants' responses. The results show that the respondents see their own personal attributes and their organizational environment as equally important for their career development. They attribute success to internal qualities and do not perceive significant barriers to their career development from external sources. This finding is in conflict with many studies which show that women experience significant barriers to entry and barriers to participation, especially in professional fields. In the case of the science profession, however, women continue to be such a small minority of the workforce that survival may necessitate their adoption of the male values which inevitably dominate in their workplaces.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages19-27
    Number of pages9
    JournalInternational Journal of Career Management
    Volume6
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    Career development
    Work place
    Minorities
    Organizational environment
    Career theory
    Workforce
    Concept mapping
    Barriers to entry
    New Zealand
    Participation

    Keywords

    • career development
    • women
    • careers
    • New Zealand
    • science research

    Cite this

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    title = "How do women scientists perceive their own career development?",
    abstract = "Examines the applicability of current career theory to women scientists. Data were collected from a group of New Zealand women scientists and interpreted using the Concept Mapping technique which produces a two-dimensional visual map of the participants' responses. The results show that the respondents see their own personal attributes and their organizational environment as equally important for their career development. They attribute success to internal qualities and do not perceive significant barriers to their career development from external sources. This finding is in conflict with many studies which show that women experience significant barriers to entry and barriers to participation, especially in professional fields. In the case of the science profession, however, women continue to be such a small minority of the workforce that survival may necessitate their adoption of the male values which inevitably dominate in their workplaces.",
    keywords = "career development, women, careers, New Zealand, science research",
    author = "Barbara Simpson",
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    How do women scientists perceive their own career development? / Simpson, Barbara.

    In: International Journal of Career Management, Vol. 6, No. 1, 1994, p. 19-27.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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