High school rugby, the body and the reproduction of hegemonic masculinity

R. Light, D. Kirk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wacquant (1995) argues that the irony of the body's increasing visibility in the social science literature is the absence of studies that deal with actual flesh and blood bodies. Focused on an elite, independent high school in Australia this paper examines the relationship between young men's experiences of rugby training and the embodiment of a 'traditional', hegemonic form of masculinity. Drawing on the work of Bourdieu, Foucault and Connell it examines the corporeal and discursive practices that constituted rugby training for a small group of boys in the school's 1st XV. In doing so it identifies the ways in which this acted to reproduce a hegemonic form of masculinity increasingly under threat in rapidly changing social, cultural and economic conditions.
LanguageEnglish
Pages163-176
Number of pages14
JournalSport, Education and Society
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2000

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Masculinity
Football
masculinity
Reproduction
Medicine in Literature
Social Sciences
Social Conditions
irony
school
small group
elite
social science
Economics
threat
economics
experience
literature

Keywords

  • masculinity
  • rugby
  • hegemonic form

Cite this

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High school rugby, the body and the reproduction of hegemonic masculinity. / Light, R.; Kirk, D.

In: Sport, Education and Society, Vol. 5, No. 2, 10.2000, p. 163-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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