Here and Now: An Evaluation of Barnardo's Trauma, Bereavement and Loss Service in Schools

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

In the United Kingdom it is estimated that 92% of young people will experience a bereavement of a 'close' relationship that includes family, friends and pets, before the age of 16 (Harrison & Harrington, 2001). In Scotland, a more recent survey found that 79% of secondary school pupils, aged 12 to 17 years, have experienced the death of someone important to them (Del Carpio, Rasmussen, & Paul, 2018).Bereavement during childhood is therefore a majority experience, yet whilst it may be a universal part of growing up, experiencing a death can also be a major life event that places a young person at increased risk of a range of negative outcomes. For example, it is suggested that bereaved young people are at greater risk of developing depressive symptoms (Harrison & Harrington, 2001), being abused (Cross, 2002) and teenage pregnancy (Sweeting, West, & Richards, 1998). Vulnerable populations of young people, such as those involved in offending, are also more likely than the general population to have experienced multiple, parental or traumatic bereavements (Finlay & Jones, 2000; Vaswani, 2008; Vaswani, 2014).
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
Commissioning bodyBarnardos Scotland
Number of pages33
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

trauma
evaluation
school
secondary school pupil
death
pregnancy
experience
childhood
human being
event

Keywords

  • trauma care
  • bereavement care
  • Barnardos

Cite this

@book{347838e1aec94c02a4305c5382213dcf,
title = "Here and Now: An Evaluation of Barnardo's Trauma, Bereavement and Loss Service in Schools",
abstract = "In the United Kingdom it is estimated that 92{\%} of young people will experience a bereavement of a 'close' relationship that includes family, friends and pets, before the age of 16 (Harrison & Harrington, 2001). In Scotland, a more recent survey found that 79{\%} of secondary school pupils, aged 12 to 17 years, have experienced the death of someone important to them (Del Carpio, Rasmussen, & Paul, 2018).Bereavement during childhood is therefore a majority experience, yet whilst it may be a universal part of growing up, experiencing a death can also be a major life event that places a young person at increased risk of a range of negative outcomes. For example, it is suggested that bereaved young people are at greater risk of developing depressive symptoms (Harrison & Harrington, 2001), being abused (Cross, 2002) and teenage pregnancy (Sweeting, West, & Richards, 1998). Vulnerable populations of young people, such as those involved in offending, are also more likely than the general population to have experienced multiple, parental or traumatic bereavements (Finlay & Jones, 2000; Vaswani, 2008; Vaswani, 2014).",
keywords = "trauma care, bereavement care, Barnardos",
author = "Fern Gillon and Nina Vaswani and Sally Paul",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "31",
language = "English",

}

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T2 - An Evaluation of Barnardo's Trauma, Bereavement and Loss Service in Schools

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AU - Vaswani, Nina

AU - Paul, Sally

PY - 2019/7/31

Y1 - 2019/7/31

N2 - In the United Kingdom it is estimated that 92% of young people will experience a bereavement of a 'close' relationship that includes family, friends and pets, before the age of 16 (Harrison & Harrington, 2001). In Scotland, a more recent survey found that 79% of secondary school pupils, aged 12 to 17 years, have experienced the death of someone important to them (Del Carpio, Rasmussen, & Paul, 2018).Bereavement during childhood is therefore a majority experience, yet whilst it may be a universal part of growing up, experiencing a death can also be a major life event that places a young person at increased risk of a range of negative outcomes. For example, it is suggested that bereaved young people are at greater risk of developing depressive symptoms (Harrison & Harrington, 2001), being abused (Cross, 2002) and teenage pregnancy (Sweeting, West, & Richards, 1998). Vulnerable populations of young people, such as those involved in offending, are also more likely than the general population to have experienced multiple, parental or traumatic bereavements (Finlay & Jones, 2000; Vaswani, 2008; Vaswani, 2014).

AB - In the United Kingdom it is estimated that 92% of young people will experience a bereavement of a 'close' relationship that includes family, friends and pets, before the age of 16 (Harrison & Harrington, 2001). In Scotland, a more recent survey found that 79% of secondary school pupils, aged 12 to 17 years, have experienced the death of someone important to them (Del Carpio, Rasmussen, & Paul, 2018).Bereavement during childhood is therefore a majority experience, yet whilst it may be a universal part of growing up, experiencing a death can also be a major life event that places a young person at increased risk of a range of negative outcomes. For example, it is suggested that bereaved young people are at greater risk of developing depressive symptoms (Harrison & Harrington, 2001), being abused (Cross, 2002) and teenage pregnancy (Sweeting, West, & Richards, 1998). Vulnerable populations of young people, such as those involved in offending, are also more likely than the general population to have experienced multiple, parental or traumatic bereavements (Finlay & Jones, 2000; Vaswani, 2008; Vaswani, 2014).

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KW - bereavement care

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