Health Provision for Young People Aged Under 18 in and Leaving SPS Custody

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

It is widely recognised that there is a cyclical link between inequality, offending, being a victim and poor health (see for example the Report of the Ministerial Group on Offender Reintegration). However, a period of detention in custody can present an opportunity to address the health and wellbeing of a particularly marginalised group of people. Since 2011, responsibility for health care in prisons, including for dental and optometry treatment, has belonged to NHS Scotland. Under Principle 9 of the UN (1990) Basic Principles for the Treatment of Prisoners: “Prisoners shall have access to the health services available in the country without discrimination on the grounds of their legal situation”. As a result, individuals are entitled to the same healthcare whether they are in the community or in custody.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages2
Edition65
Publication statusPublished - 22 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

child custody
prisoner
reintegration
health
correctional institution
offender
UNO
health service
discrimination
Group
health care
responsibility
community

Keywords

  • child offenders
  • young people in custody
  • criminal Justice
  • young offenders
  • custody
  • health provision

Cite this

Nolan, Debbie. / Health Provision for Young People Aged Under 18 in and Leaving SPS Custody. 65 ed. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2017. 2 p.
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Health Provision for Young People Aged Under 18 in and Leaving SPS Custody. / Nolan, Debbie.

65 ed. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2017. 2 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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N2 - It is widely recognised that there is a cyclical link between inequality, offending, being a victim and poor health (see for example the Report of the Ministerial Group on Offender Reintegration). However, a period of detention in custody can present an opportunity to address the health and wellbeing of a particularly marginalised group of people. Since 2011, responsibility for health care in prisons, including for dental and optometry treatment, has belonged to NHS Scotland. Under Principle 9 of the UN (1990) Basic Principles for the Treatment of Prisoners: “Prisoners shall have access to the health services available in the country without discrimination on the grounds of their legal situation”. As a result, individuals are entitled to the same healthcare whether they are in the community or in custody.

AB - It is widely recognised that there is a cyclical link between inequality, offending, being a victim and poor health (see for example the Report of the Ministerial Group on Offender Reintegration). However, a period of detention in custody can present an opportunity to address the health and wellbeing of a particularly marginalised group of people. Since 2011, responsibility for health care in prisons, including for dental and optometry treatment, has belonged to NHS Scotland. Under Principle 9 of the UN (1990) Basic Principles for the Treatment of Prisoners: “Prisoners shall have access to the health services available in the country without discrimination on the grounds of their legal situation”. As a result, individuals are entitled to the same healthcare whether they are in the community or in custody.

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KW - criminal Justice

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Nolan D. Health Provision for Young People Aged Under 18 in and Leaving SPS Custody. 65 ed. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde, 2017. 2 p.