GTOC9

Methods and results from University of Strathclyde (team Strath++)

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Abstract

The design and planning of space trajectories is a challenging problem in mission analysis. In the last years global optimisation techniques have proven to be a valuable tool for automating the design process that otherwise would mostly rely on engineers’ expertise. The paper presents the optimisation approach and problem formulation proposed by the team Strathclyde++ to address the problem of the 9th edition of the Global Trajectory Optimisation Competition. While the solution approach is introduced for the design of a set of multiple debris removal missions, the solution idea can be generalised to a wider set of trajectory design problems that have a similar structure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-70
Number of pages14
JournalActa Futura
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Trajectories
Global optimization
Debris
Engineers
Planning

Keywords

  • global trajectory optimisation competition
  • GTOC
  • European Space Agency
  • low Earth orbit (LEO)
  • Kessler run
  • debris removal
  • space missions
  • astronautics

Cite this

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title = "GTOC9: Methods and results from University of Strathclyde (team Strath++)",
abstract = "The design and planning of space trajectories is a challenging problem in mission analysis. In the last years global optimisation techniques have proven to be a valuable tool for automating the design process that otherwise would mostly rely on engineers’ expertise. The paper presents the optimisation approach and problem formulation proposed by the team Strathclyde++ to address the problem of the 9th edition of the Global Trajectory Optimisation Competition. While the solution approach is introduced for the design of a set of multiple debris removal missions, the solution idea can be generalised to a wider set of trajectory design problems that have a similar structure.",
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author = "{Ortega Absil}, Carlos and Ricciardi, {Lorenzo A.} and {Di Carlo}, Marilena and Cristian Greco and Romain Serra and Mateusz Polnik and Aram Vroom and Annalisa Riccardi and Edmondo Minisci and Massimiliano Vasile",
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AU - Serra, Romain

AU - Polnik, Mateusz

AU - Vroom, Aram

AU - Riccardi, Annalisa

AU - Minisci, Edmondo

AU - Vasile, Massimiliano

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