Growing taller, living longer? Anthropometric history and the future of old age

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In recent years, economic and social historians have made increasing use of
    anthropometric records (principally, records of human height and weight) to
    investigate changes in human health and well-being. This paper summarises
    some of the main ®ndings of this research and demonstrates the remarkable
    increases in human height which have occurred during the course of the
    present century. The paper also examines the relationship between changes in
    average height and changes in life expectancy. Although most of the evidence
    assembled by anthropometric historians has been derived from records
    relating to schoolchildren and young adults, their work has profound
    implications for the study of health in old age. The concluding section
    examines the relevance of this work to current debates on the decline of
    mortality, the `compression of morbidity' and the future of social policy.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages491-512
    Number of pages22
    JournalAgeing and Society
    Volume17
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

    Fingerprint

    old age
    historian
    History
    life expectancy
    history
    health
    schoolchild
    morbidity
    young adult
    well-being
    Health
    Public Policy
    Life Expectancy
    Young Adult
    Economics
    Morbidity
    economics
    Weights and Measures
    Research
    Anthropometric History

    Keywords

    • growing taller
    • living longer
    • anthropometric history
    • old age
    • longevity
    • anthropometry

    Cite this

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    Growing taller, living longer? Anthropometric history and the future of old age. / Harris, Bernard.

    In: Ageing and Society, Vol. 17, No. 5, 1997, p. 491-512.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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