Groundwater resources in the Lagan Valley Sandstone aquifer, Northern Ireland

Robert Kalin, C. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beneath Belfast and the Lagan Valley lies Northern Ireland's most important aquifer, the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone. Up to 300 m in thickness and with a total abstraction of around 31 000 m(3)/d, it is a modest aquifer by UK and world standards; nonetheless, it is an important local water source. The use of this aquifer system as a water supply will undoubtedly increase as growth of industry and population continues in the Belfast metropolitan area. Even with the mesic climate of Ireland, groundwater mining of this aquifer system is already occurring, and thus there is a need for detailed aquifer planning and protection to be implemented in order to preserve this resource for the future.
LanguageEnglish
Pages133-139
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1997

Fingerprint

Groundwater resources
groundwater resource
Sandstone
Aquifers
sandstone
aquifer
valley
Water supply
metropolitan area
Groundwater
Triassic
water supply
Planning
groundwater
industry
climate
resource
Water
Industry

Keywords

  • aquifer
  • groundwater
  • hydrogeology
  • water quality
  • water supply
  • well head protection

Cite this

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abstract = "Beneath Belfast and the Lagan Valley lies Northern Ireland's most important aquifer, the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone. Up to 300 m in thickness and with a total abstraction of around 31 000 m(3)/d, it is a modest aquifer by UK and world standards; nonetheless, it is an important local water source. The use of this aquifer system as a water supply will undoubtedly increase as growth of industry and population continues in the Belfast metropolitan area. Even with the mesic climate of Ireland, groundwater mining of this aquifer system is already occurring, and thus there is a need for detailed aquifer planning and protection to be implemented in order to preserve this resource for the future.",
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Groundwater resources in the Lagan Valley Sandstone aquifer, Northern Ireland. / Kalin, Robert; Roberts, C.

In: Journal of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management, Vol. 11, No. 2, 04.1997, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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