Government funding, employment conditions, and work organization in non-profit community services: a comparative study

Ian Cunningham, Donna Baines, Sara Charlesworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The article provides a comparative exploration of New Public Management (NPM) funding models on the non-profit sectors in the UK and Australia, and the implications for services, employment conditions, and worker commitment. A degree of convergence exists around the principles of NPM in the two case studies, creating employment regimes of low pay, casualization, and work intensification. Enhanced vulnerability to pay cuts in the UK, and insecurity in Australia are explained by national differences in exposure to recession, industrial relations institutions, and competition, leading to diminishing worker commitment and raising important concerns for policy-makers as benefits gained from outsourcing to non-profits are eroded.

LanguageEnglish
Pages582-598
Number of pages17
JournalPublic Administration
Volume92
Issue number3
Early online date20 Mar 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Fingerprint

employment conditions
work organization
New Public Management
community service
funding
commitment
worker
non-profit sector
industrial relations
outsourcing
recession
vulnerability
regime

Keywords

  • new public management funding
  • employment conditions
  • worker commitment
  • work organisation

Cite this

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Government funding, employment conditions, and work organization in non-profit community services : a comparative study. / Cunningham, Ian; Baines, Donna; Charlesworth, Sara.

In: Public Administration, Vol. 92, No. 3, 09.2014, p. 582-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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