Go climb a mountain: an application of recreation demand modelling to rock climbing in Scotland

Nick Hanley, G.M. Koop, B. Alvarez-Farizo, R.E. Wright, C. Nevin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we apply random utility modelling techniques to rock-climbing in Scotland. Attributes relevant to choices over rock-climbing sites were identified from focus groups with climbers, along with a categorisation of principal climbing areas. A survey of climbers yielded 267 responses, which were then used as the basis for modelling. We compare a standard multi-nominal logit model with a random parameters approach, and look at seasonal differences in behaviour, and at the implications of different treatments of travel time. The random utility models showed that most of the attributes selected were significant determinants of choice. Welfare estimates of changes in site attributes are presented, which are relevant to policy choices currently facing land managers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-52
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Agricultural Economics
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2001

Keywords

  • choice experiments
  • complexity
  • environmental valuation
  • rationality
  • recreation demand
  • rock climbing

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Go climb a mountain: an application of recreation demand modelling to rock climbing in Scotland'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this