Getting acceptance that radically new working practices are required: institutionalization of arguments about change in a healthcare organization

John A.A. Sillince, Gopalakrishnan Harindranath, Charles E. Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article considers data from a hospital that was introducing an experimental new facility onto an existing site, including the process of institutionalization of the argument 'The new facility requires radically new working practices.' The data are used to test a proposed integration of Barley and Tolbert's (1997) model of the psychological mechanisms involved in institutionalization with a political model of how motives vary during the stages of organizational change. There is some empirical support for a congruence between the two models, namely, that psychological encoding matches with political recognition, psychological enactment matches with political transition, and psychological replication and externalization match with political consolidation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1421-1454
Number of pages33
JournalHuman Relations
Volume54
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

institutionalization
acceptance
organization
organizational change
Consolidation
consolidation
Psychological
Institutionalization
Working practices
Acceptance
Health care organization
Healthcare

Keywords

  • institutionalisation
  • organisational change
  • rhetoric
  • health
  • change management

Cite this

Sillince, John A.A. ; Harindranath, Gopalakrishnan ; Harvey, Charles E. / Getting acceptance that radically new working practices are required: institutionalization of arguments about change in a healthcare organization. In: Human Relations. 2001 ; Vol. 54, No. 11. pp. 1421-1454.
@article{0ab372f493694c6f9a47d135a5121edf,
title = "Getting acceptance that radically new working practices are required: institutionalization of arguments about change in a healthcare organization",
abstract = "This article considers data from a hospital that was introducing an experimental new facility onto an existing site, including the process of institutionalization of the argument 'The new facility requires radically new working practices.' The data are used to test a proposed integration of Barley and Tolbert's (1997) model of the psychological mechanisms involved in institutionalization with a political model of how motives vary during the stages of organizational change. There is some empirical support for a congruence between the two models, namely, that psychological encoding matches with political recognition, psychological enactment matches with political transition, and psychological replication and externalization match with political consolidation.",
keywords = "institutionalisation, organisational change, rhetoric, health, change management",
author = "Sillince, {John A.A.} and Gopalakrishnan Harindranath and Harvey, {Charles E.}",
year = "2001",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
pages = "1421--1454",
journal = "Human Relations",
issn = "0018-7267",
number = "11",

}

Getting acceptance that radically new working practices are required: institutionalization of arguments about change in a healthcare organization. / Sillince, John A.A.; Harindranath, Gopalakrishnan; Harvey, Charles E.

In: Human Relations, Vol. 54, No. 11, 2001, p. 1421-1454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Getting acceptance that radically new working practices are required: institutionalization of arguments about change in a healthcare organization

AU - Sillince, John A.A.

AU - Harindranath, Gopalakrishnan

AU - Harvey, Charles E.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - This article considers data from a hospital that was introducing an experimental new facility onto an existing site, including the process of institutionalization of the argument 'The new facility requires radically new working practices.' The data are used to test a proposed integration of Barley and Tolbert's (1997) model of the psychological mechanisms involved in institutionalization with a political model of how motives vary during the stages of organizational change. There is some empirical support for a congruence between the two models, namely, that psychological encoding matches with political recognition, psychological enactment matches with political transition, and psychological replication and externalization match with political consolidation.

AB - This article considers data from a hospital that was introducing an experimental new facility onto an existing site, including the process of institutionalization of the argument 'The new facility requires radically new working practices.' The data are used to test a proposed integration of Barley and Tolbert's (1997) model of the psychological mechanisms involved in institutionalization with a political model of how motives vary during the stages of organizational change. There is some empirical support for a congruence between the two models, namely, that psychological encoding matches with political recognition, psychological enactment matches with political transition, and psychological replication and externalization match with political consolidation.

KW - institutionalisation

KW - organisational change

KW - rhetoric

KW - health

KW - change management

UR - http://hum.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/54/11/1421

M3 - Article

VL - 54

SP - 1421

EP - 1454

JO - Human Relations

T2 - Human Relations

JF - Human Relations

SN - 0018-7267

IS - 11

ER -