From transition towns to smart cities: opportunities and challenges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The article highlights two successful approaches in engaging with political structures and communities to address global issues such as climate change, species extinction, global population growth, poverty, housing shortage, aging population, energy security, financial crisis and economic recession. While one approach focused on how to influence governments to make a transition to low carbon economy, the other one turned to communities and individuals with the aim to initiate social innovation which will lead to more sustainable living. The first one has influenced industrial innovation, the second social innovation. Both have the opportunity to achieve greater impacts with an increased availability of data required for social innovation, i.e. problem-solving and social change achieved through the activism of social groups, organisations, communities and individuals. As small towns might develop social innovations faster than big cities, and as these should be captured and shared, the article provided an example of the growing social innovation activities in a small Scottish town stimulated by both of the above approaches.
LanguageEnglish
Pages26-28
Number of pages3
JournalComputers and Law
Volume26
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015
EventDesigning Smart Cities CReATE - TIC, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 31 Mar 20151 Apr 2015

Fingerprint

Innovation
Energy security
Climate change
Smart city
Aging of materials
Availability
Economics
Carbon

Keywords

  • big data
  • social innovation
  • communities

Cite this

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title = "From transition towns to smart cities: opportunities and challenges",
abstract = "The article highlights two successful approaches in engaging with political structures and communities to address global issues such as climate change, species extinction, global population growth, poverty, housing shortage, aging population, energy security, financial crisis and economic recession. While one approach focused on how to influence governments to make a transition to low carbon economy, the other one turned to communities and individuals with the aim to initiate social innovation which will lead to more sustainable living. The first one has influenced industrial innovation, the second social innovation. Both have the opportunity to achieve greater impacts with an increased availability of data required for social innovation, i.e. problem-solving and social change achieved through the activism of social groups, organisations, communities and individuals. As small towns might develop social innovations faster than big cities, and as these should be captured and shared, the article provided an example of the growing social innovation activities in a small Scottish town stimulated by both of the above approaches.",
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From transition towns to smart cities : opportunities and challenges. / Dimitrijevic, Branka.

In: Computers and Law, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.07.2015, p. 26-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The article highlights two successful approaches in engaging with political structures and communities to address global issues such as climate change, species extinction, global population growth, poverty, housing shortage, aging population, energy security, financial crisis and economic recession. While one approach focused on how to influence governments to make a transition to low carbon economy, the other one turned to communities and individuals with the aim to initiate social innovation which will lead to more sustainable living. The first one has influenced industrial innovation, the second social innovation. Both have the opportunity to achieve greater impacts with an increased availability of data required for social innovation, i.e. problem-solving and social change achieved through the activism of social groups, organisations, communities and individuals. As small towns might develop social innovations faster than big cities, and as these should be captured and shared, the article provided an example of the growing social innovation activities in a small Scottish town stimulated by both of the above approaches.

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