From (B)edouin to (A)borigine: the myth of the desert noble savage

Rune Graulund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the myth of the supposed superiority of the desert noble savage over civilized man. With the Bedouin of Arabia and the Aborigines of Australia as its two prime examples, the article argues that two versions of this myth can be traced: one in which the desert noble savage is valorized due to his valour, physical prowess and martial skill (Bedouin); and another, later version, where the desert noble savage is valorized as a pacifist, an ecologist and a mythmaker/storyteller (Aborigines). The article concludes by examining the way in which this turn from one type of desert noble savage to another reflects the manner in which western modernity has shifted its values from Cartesian dualities and Enlightenment rationalism to that of networks, potentialities, ecology and myth.
LanguageEnglish
Pages79-104
Number of pages26
JournalHistory of the Human Sciences
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Noble Savage
Aborigines
Rationalism
Superiority
Ecology
Physical
Enlightenment
Duality
Storyteller
Modernity
Pacifist
Arabia
Potentiality
Cartesian

Keywords

  • the noble savage
  • myth
  • desert
  • Bedouins
  • Australian Aborigines

Cite this

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From (B)edouin to (A)borigine : the myth of the desert noble savage. / Graulund, Rune.

In: History of the Human Sciences, Vol. 22, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 79-104 .

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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