Free-living physical activity and energy expenditure of rural children and adolescents in the Nandi region of Kenya

Robert Ojiambo, Alexander R Gibson, Kenn Konstabel, Daniel E Lieberman, John R Speakman, John J Reilly, Yannis P Pitsiladis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine the relationship between physical activity and energy demands in children and adolescents with highly active lifestyles.

Physical activity patterns of 30 rural Kenyan children and adolescents (14 ± 1 years, mean ± SD) with median body mass index (BMI) z-score = −1.06 [−3.29–0.67] median [range] were assessed by accelerometry over 1 week. Daily energy expenditure (DEE), activity-induced energy expenditure (AEE) and physical activity level (PAL) were simultaneously determined using doubly-labelled water (DLW). Active commuting to school was assessed by global positioning system.

Mean DEE, AEE and PAL were 12.2 ± 3.4, 5.7 ± 3.0 MJ/day and 2.3 ± 0.6, respectively. A model combining body mass, average accelerometer counts per minute and time in light activities predicted 45% of the variance in DEE (p < 0.05) with a standard error of DEE estimate of 2.7 MJ/day. Furthermore, AEE accounted for 47% of DEE. Distance to school was not related to variation in DEE, AEE or PAL and there was no association between active commuting and adiposity.

High physical activity levels were associated with much higher levels of energy expenditure than observed in Western societies. These results oppose the concept of physical activity being stable and constrained in humans.




Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/03014460.2013.775344
LanguageEnglish
Pages318-323
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Human Biology
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

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Kenya
Energy Metabolism
expenditures
Exercise
adolescent
energy
Accelerometry
Geographic Information Systems
energy shortage
Adiposity
Life Style
school
Body Mass Index
Light

Keywords

  • free- living
  • physical activity
  • energy expenditure
  • rural children
  • adolescents
  • Nandi region
  • kenya

Cite this

Ojiambo, Robert ; Gibson, Alexander R ; Konstabel, Kenn ; Lieberman, Daniel E ; Speakman, John R ; Reilly, John J ; Pitsiladis, Yannis P. / Free-living physical activity and energy expenditure of rural children and adolescents in the Nandi region of Kenya. In: Annals of Human Biology. 2013 ; Vol. 40, No. 4. pp. 318-323.
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Free-living physical activity and energy expenditure of rural children and adolescents in the Nandi region of Kenya. / Ojiambo, Robert; Gibson, Alexander R; Konstabel, Kenn; Lieberman, Daniel E; Speakman, John R; Reilly, John J; Pitsiladis, Yannis P.

In: Annals of Human Biology, Vol. 40, No. 4, 07.2013, p. 318-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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