Framing Policy on Low Emissions Vehicles in Terms of Economic Gains: Might the Most Straightforward Gain Be Delivered by Supply Chain Activity to Support Refuelling?

Oluwafisayo Alabi, John Irvine, Martin Smith, Karen Turner

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

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Abstract

A core theme of the UK Government’s new Industrial Strategy is exploiting opportunities for domestic supply chain development. This extends to a special 'Automotive Sector Deal' that focuses on the shift to low emissions vehicles (LEVs). Here attention is on electric vehicle and battery production and innovation. In this paper, we argue that a more straightforward gain in terms of framing policy around potential economic benefits may be made through supply chain activity to support refuelling of battery/hydrogen vehicles. We set this in the context of LEV refuelling supply chains potentially replicating the strength of domestic upstream linkages observed in the UK electricity and/or gas industries. We use input-output multiplier analysis to deconstruct and assess the structure of these supply chains relative to that of more importintensive petrol and diesel supply. A crucial multiplier result is that for every £1million of spending on electricity (or gas), 8 full-time equivalent jobs are supported throughout the UK. This compares to less than 3 in the case of petrol/diesel supply. Moreover, the importance of service industries becomes apparent, with 67% of indirect and induced supply chain employment to support electricity generation being located in services industries. The comparable figure for GDP is 42%.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Pages1-29
Number of pages30
Volume18
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Keywords

  • electric vehicles
  • input-output model
  • miltipliers
  • value-added multiplier
  • employment multiplier
  • supply chain development

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