Formulation and characterisation of PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvants

Daniel J. Kirby, Randip Kaur, Yvonne Perrie

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There appear to be several factors that confirm the viability of polymeric microspheres as vaccine delivery vehicles, including the ability to enhance targeting of antigen-presenting cells, the potential for controlled, sustained release of antigen-thereby potentially eliminating the need for multiple vaccination doses-as well as the ability of the polymer matrix to not only facilitate more efficient delivery by acting as a shield from the hostile external environment, but also the potential to reduce adverse reactions and abrogate problems caused by the vaccine strain in immunocompromised individuals. In addition, microspheres offer great variability in terms of manufacturing processes, constituents (including additional adjuvants), physico-chemical properties and immunological efficacy.This chapter investigates the advantageous properties of microspheres-and more specifically, those composed primarily of polylactide-co-glycolide-for the delivery of vaccine adjuvants by outlining the various preparation techniques and the effect of the related processing parameters, the subsequent in vivo efficacy, and, finally, the potential for a desirable product with an extended shelf-life.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationImmunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines
Place of PublicationNew York
Pages263-289
Number of pages27
Volume5
ISBN (Electronic)9781461450702
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Sep 2012

Publication series

NameImmunomics Reviews
PublisherSpringer
Volume5

Fingerprint

Microspheres
Vaccines
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Polymers
Vaccination
Antigens
polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer

Keywords

  • burst release
  • tetanus toxoid
  • PLGA microsphere
  • double emulsion
  • mucosal immune response

Cite this

Kirby, D. J., Kaur, R., & Perrie, Y. (2012). Formulation and characterisation of PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvants. In Immunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines (Vol. 5, pp. 263-289). (Immunomics Reviews; Vol. 5). New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5070-2_13
Kirby, Daniel J. ; Kaur, Randip ; Perrie, Yvonne. / Formulation and characterisation of PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvants. Immunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines. Vol. 5 New York, 2012. pp. 263-289 (Immunomics Reviews).
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Kirby, DJ, Kaur, R & Perrie, Y 2012, Formulation and characterisation of PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvants. in Immunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines. vol. 5, Immunomics Reviews, vol. 5, New York, pp. 263-289. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5070-2_13

Formulation and characterisation of PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvants. / Kirby, Daniel J.; Kaur, Randip; Perrie, Yvonne.

Immunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines. Vol. 5 New York, 2012. p. 263-289 (Immunomics Reviews; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Kirby DJ, Kaur R, Perrie Y. Formulation and characterisation of PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvants. In Immunomic Discovery of Adjuvants and Candidate Subunit Vaccines. Vol. 5. New York. 2012. p. 263-289. (Immunomics Reviews). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5070-2_13