Fluorescence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter surveys some of the main capabilities, techniques, and measurements that are enabled by fluorescence. It covers spectra, quantum yield, lifetime, quenching, anisotropy, and microscopy, in each case citing topical review articles, many of the original references, underlying theory and modern day applications. Measuring absorption and fluorescence spectra is usually the first place to start in any fluorescence study. In order to illustrate how absorption and fluorescence spectra often interplay in tandem, the chapter considers the example of the auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) to produce melanin. Lifetime measurement has emerged in recent years as the most powerful and versatile technique in fluorescence spectroscopy. The basis of fluorescence anisotropy techniques is to use polarized excitation to create a spatially selected, non-random, distribution of excited fluorescent molecules which then randomize, most commonly by Brownian rotation, but also at times by energy migration depending on the system.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationPhotonics: Scientific Foundations, Technology and Applications
Subtitle of host publicationBiomedical Photonics, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy
EditorsDavid L. Andrews
Place of PublicationHoboken, New Jersey
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Inc.
Pages1-58
Number of pages58
VolumeIV
Edition1st
ISBN (Print)9781118225554
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Feb 2015

Fingerprint

fluorescence
absorption spectra
melanin
life (durability)
anisotropy
phenylalanine
quenching
microscopy
oxidation
spectroscopy
excitation
molecules
energy

Keywords

  • fluorescence anisotropy
  • fluorescence lifetime
  • fluorescence microscopy
  • fluorescence quantum yield
  • fluorescence quenching
  • fluorescence spectra

Cite this

Birch, D. J. S., Chen, Y., & Rolinski, O. J. (2015). Fluorescence. In D. L. Andrews (Ed.), Photonics: Scientific Foundations, Technology and Applications: Biomedical Photonics, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy (1st ed., Vol. IV, pp. 1-58). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119011804.ch1
Birch, David J. S. ; Chen, Yu ; Rolinski, Olaf J. / Fluorescence. Photonics: Scientific Foundations, Technology and Applications: Biomedical Photonics, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy. editor / David L. Andrews. Vol. IV 1st. ed. Hoboken, New Jersey : John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2015. pp. 1-58
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Birch, DJS, Chen, Y & Rolinski, OJ 2015, Fluorescence. in DL Andrews (ed.), Photonics: Scientific Foundations, Technology and Applications: Biomedical Photonics, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy. 1st edn, vol. IV, John Wiley & Sons Inc., Hoboken, New Jersey, pp. 1-58. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119011804.ch1

Fluorescence. / Birch, David J. S.; Chen, Yu; Rolinski, Olaf J.

Photonics: Scientific Foundations, Technology and Applications: Biomedical Photonics, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy. ed. / David L. Andrews. Vol. IV 1st. ed. Hoboken, New Jersey : John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2015. p. 1-58.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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AU - Rolinski, Olaf J.

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N2 - This chapter surveys some of the main capabilities, techniques, and measurements that are enabled by fluorescence. It covers spectra, quantum yield, lifetime, quenching, anisotropy, and microscopy, in each case citing topical review articles, many of the original references, underlying theory and modern day applications. Measuring absorption and fluorescence spectra is usually the first place to start in any fluorescence study. In order to illustrate how absorption and fluorescence spectra often interplay in tandem, the chapter considers the example of the auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) to produce melanin. Lifetime measurement has emerged in recent years as the most powerful and versatile technique in fluorescence spectroscopy. The basis of fluorescence anisotropy techniques is to use polarized excitation to create a spatially selected, non-random, distribution of excited fluorescent molecules which then randomize, most commonly by Brownian rotation, but also at times by energy migration depending on the system.

AB - This chapter surveys some of the main capabilities, techniques, and measurements that are enabled by fluorescence. It covers spectra, quantum yield, lifetime, quenching, anisotropy, and microscopy, in each case citing topical review articles, many of the original references, underlying theory and modern day applications. Measuring absorption and fluorescence spectra is usually the first place to start in any fluorescence study. In order to illustrate how absorption and fluorescence spectra often interplay in tandem, the chapter considers the example of the auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (l-DOPA) to produce melanin. Lifetime measurement has emerged in recent years as the most powerful and versatile technique in fluorescence spectroscopy. The basis of fluorescence anisotropy techniques is to use polarized excitation to create a spatially selected, non-random, distribution of excited fluorescent molecules which then randomize, most commonly by Brownian rotation, but also at times by energy migration depending on the system.

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KW - fluorescence quenching

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Birch DJS, Chen Y, Rolinski OJ. Fluorescence. In Andrews DL, editor, Photonics: Scientific Foundations, Technology and Applications: Biomedical Photonics, Spectroscopy, and Microscopy. 1st ed. Vol. IV. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc. 2015. p. 1-58 https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119011804.ch1