FITNESSGRAM BMI Standards: BMI Standards: Should They Be Race-Specific?

D.A. Rowe, M. Mahar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to evaluate race-specific FITNESSGRAM® body mass index (BMI) standards in comparison to the recommended standards, i.e., percent fat (%BF) ³25 in boys and %BF ³32 in girls. Methods: BMI and %BF were estimated in 1,968 Black and White children ages 6-14 years, using methods similar to those used to develop the current FITNESSGRAM standards. Multiple regression was employed to develop age-, sex-, and race-specific BMI standards. Percent agreement and modified kappa (kq) were used to evaluate agreement with the %BF standards, and sensitivity and specificity were used to evaluate classification accuracy. Concludes that Race-specific BMI standards appear to be a more accurate representation of unhealthy %BF levels than the current FITNESSGRAM BMI standards.
LanguageEnglish
PagesS58-S66
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume3
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Fats
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • race
  • physical activity
  • fitness
  • health

Cite this

@article{7660518f17924105b54dffdf62fcda0a,
title = "FITNESSGRAM BMI Standards: BMI Standards: Should They Be Race-Specific?",
abstract = "The purpose of the study was to evaluate race-specific FITNESSGRAM{\circledR} body mass index (BMI) standards in comparison to the recommended standards, i.e., percent fat ({\%}BF) ³25 in boys and {\%}BF ³32 in girls. Methods: BMI and {\%}BF were estimated in 1,968 Black and White children ages 6-14 years, using methods similar to those used to develop the current FITNESSGRAM standards. Multiple regression was employed to develop age-, sex-, and race-specific BMI standards. Percent agreement and modified kappa (kq) were used to evaluate agreement with the {\%}BF standards, and sensitivity and specificity were used to evaluate classification accuracy. Concludes that Race-specific BMI standards appear to be a more accurate representation of unhealthy {\%}BF levels than the current FITNESSGRAM BMI standards.",
keywords = "race, physical activity, fitness, health",
author = "D.A. Rowe and M. Mahar",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "S58--S66",
journal = "Journal of Physical Activity and Health",
issn = "1543-3080",
number = "2",

}

FITNESSGRAM BMI Standards: BMI Standards: Should They Be Race-Specific? / Rowe, D.A.; Mahar, M.

In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, Vol. 3, No. 2, 2006, p. S58-S66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - FITNESSGRAM BMI Standards: BMI Standards: Should They Be Race-Specific?

AU - Rowe, D.A.

AU - Mahar, M.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - The purpose of the study was to evaluate race-specific FITNESSGRAM® body mass index (BMI) standards in comparison to the recommended standards, i.e., percent fat (%BF) ³25 in boys and %BF ³32 in girls. Methods: BMI and %BF were estimated in 1,968 Black and White children ages 6-14 years, using methods similar to those used to develop the current FITNESSGRAM standards. Multiple regression was employed to develop age-, sex-, and race-specific BMI standards. Percent agreement and modified kappa (kq) were used to evaluate agreement with the %BF standards, and sensitivity and specificity were used to evaluate classification accuracy. Concludes that Race-specific BMI standards appear to be a more accurate representation of unhealthy %BF levels than the current FITNESSGRAM BMI standards.

AB - The purpose of the study was to evaluate race-specific FITNESSGRAM® body mass index (BMI) standards in comparison to the recommended standards, i.e., percent fat (%BF) ³25 in boys and %BF ³32 in girls. Methods: BMI and %BF were estimated in 1,968 Black and White children ages 6-14 years, using methods similar to those used to develop the current FITNESSGRAM standards. Multiple regression was employed to develop age-, sex-, and race-specific BMI standards. Percent agreement and modified kappa (kq) were used to evaluate agreement with the %BF standards, and sensitivity and specificity were used to evaluate classification accuracy. Concludes that Race-specific BMI standards appear to be a more accurate representation of unhealthy %BF levels than the current FITNESSGRAM BMI standards.

KW - race

KW - physical activity

KW - fitness

KW - health

UR - https://www.humankinetics.com/JPAH/viewarticle.cfm?aid=5747

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - S58-S66

JO - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

T2 - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

JF - Journal of Physical Activity and Health

SN - 1543-3080

IS - 2

ER -