Festival as creative destination

R. Prentice, V.A. Andersen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    215 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Edinburgh "Festival" positions the city via creativity. Its success in attracting audiences for the performing arts contrasts with the limited extent it appears to modify the general image of Scotland among its tourists. Three styles of consumption are considered: Edinburgh as a tourism-historic city; Scottish performing arts; and international performing arts. The festival is judged successful in its international arts positioning in terms of the core of serious repeat tourists it attracts, but much less so in modifying the image of Scotland as a "landscape and tradition" destination. It is suggested that if the focus of consumption is not seen as typical of a wider destination, familiarity will not necessarily impel changes in how the destination is imagined.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages7-30
    Number of pages23
    JournalAnnals of Tourism Research
    Volume30
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Fingerprint

    festival
    art
    tourist
    familiarity
    positioning
    creativity
    tourism
    Tourism
    Performing arts
    Destination
    Edinburgh
    Tourists
    Scotland
    consumption
    city

    Keywords

    • cultural tourism
    • festivals
    • marketing
    • scotland
    • tourism
    • hospitality industry
    • hotels

    Cite this

    Prentice, R. ; Andersen, V.A. / Festival as creative destination. In: Annals of Tourism Research. 2003 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 7-30.
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    Festival as creative destination. / Prentice, R.; Andersen, V.A.

    In: Annals of Tourism Research, Vol. 30, No. 1, 2003, p. 7-30.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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