FENSAP-ICE: numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes

Isik A. Ozcer, Guido S. Baruzzi, Thomas Reid, Wagdi G. Habashi, Marco Fossati, Giulio Croce

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerically predicted roughness distributions obtained in in-flight icing simulations with a beading model are used in a quasi-steady manner to compute ice shapes. This approach, called "Multishot", uses a number of steady flow and droplet solutions for computing short intervals (shots) of the total ice accretion time. The iced geometry, the grid, and the surface roughness distribution are updated after each shot, producing a better match with the unsteady ice accretion phenomena. Comparisons to multishot results with uniform roughness show that the evolution of the surface roughness distribution has a strong influence on the final ice shape. The ice horns that form are longer and thinner compared to constant roughness results. The constant roughness approach usually fails to capture the formation of the pressure side horns and under-predicts the thickness of the ice in this region. With the variable roughness produced by the beading model, the ice shape in general is captured more accurately, better matching the experimental ice shapes. Results are provided for NACA 0012 and SC 1095 airfoils for 2D icing. The flow conditions range between Mach numbers of 0.3 to 0.6, free stream static temperatures of -27°C to -6°C, free stream liquid water contents of 0.5g/m3 to 1.4 g/m3, Reynolds numbers of 2.6 to 4.4 million, and droplet diameter of 20 microns. Total ice accretion times range between 45 seconds to 7 minutes. The FENSAP-ICE icing simulation system is utilized to carry out the CFD-Icing calculations in 2D and 3D.

Conference

ConferenceSAE 2011 International Conference on Aircraft and Engine Icing and Ground Deicing
CountryUnited States
CityChicago, IL
Period13/06/1117/06/11

Fingerprint

Ice
Surface roughness
Steady flow
Airfoils
Water content
Mach number
Computational fluid dynamics
Reynolds number
Geometry
Liquids

Keywords

  • airfoils
  • computer simulation
  • density measurement (optical)
  • drops
  • Mach number
  • Reynolds number
  • surface roughness
  • droplet diameters
  • flow conditions
  • free stream
  • ice accretion
  • icing simulation
  • inflight icing
  • liquid water content
  • numerical predictions
  • pressure side
  • quasi-steady
  • roughness distributions
  • roughness evolution

Cite this

Ozcer, I. A., Baruzzi, G. S., Reid, T., Habashi, W. G., Fossati, M., & Croce, G. (2011). FENSAP-ICE: numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes. Paper presented at SAE 2011 International Conference on Aircraft and Engine Icing and Ground Deicing, Chicago, IL, United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/2011-38-0024
Ozcer, Isik A. ; Baruzzi, Guido S. ; Reid, Thomas ; Habashi, Wagdi G. ; Fossati, Marco ; Croce, Giulio. / FENSAP-ICE : numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes. Paper presented at SAE 2011 International Conference on Aircraft and Engine Icing and Ground Deicing, Chicago, IL, United States.
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abstract = "Numerically predicted roughness distributions obtained in in-flight icing simulations with a beading model are used in a quasi-steady manner to compute ice shapes. This approach, called {"}Multishot{"}, uses a number of steady flow and droplet solutions for computing short intervals (shots) of the total ice accretion time. The iced geometry, the grid, and the surface roughness distribution are updated after each shot, producing a better match with the unsteady ice accretion phenomena. Comparisons to multishot results with uniform roughness show that the evolution of the surface roughness distribution has a strong influence on the final ice shape. The ice horns that form are longer and thinner compared to constant roughness results. The constant roughness approach usually fails to capture the formation of the pressure side horns and under-predicts the thickness of the ice in this region. With the variable roughness produced by the beading model, the ice shape in general is captured more accurately, better matching the experimental ice shapes. Results are provided for NACA 0012 and SC 1095 airfoils for 2D icing. The flow conditions range between Mach numbers of 0.3 to 0.6, free stream static temperatures of -27°C to -6°C, free stream liquid water contents of 0.5g/m3 to 1.4 g/m3, Reynolds numbers of 2.6 to 4.4 million, and droplet diameter of 20 microns. Total ice accretion times range between 45 seconds to 7 minutes. The FENSAP-ICE icing simulation system is utilized to carry out the CFD-Icing calculations in 2D and 3D.",
keywords = "airfoils, computer simulation, density measurement (optical), drops, Mach number, Reynolds number, surface roughness, droplet diameters, flow conditions, free stream, ice accretion, icing simulation, inflight icing, liquid water content, numerical predictions, pressure side, quasi-steady, roughness distributions, roughness evolution",
author = "Ozcer, {Isik A.} and Baruzzi, {Guido S.} and Thomas Reid and Habashi, {Wagdi G.} and Marco Fossati and Giulio Croce",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4271/2011-38-0024",
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Ozcer, IA, Baruzzi, GS, Reid, T, Habashi, WG, Fossati, M & Croce, G 2011, 'FENSAP-ICE: numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes' Paper presented at SAE 2011 International Conference on Aircraft and Engine Icing and Ground Deicing, Chicago, IL, United States, 13/06/11 - 17/06/11, . https://doi.org/10.4271/2011-38-0024

FENSAP-ICE : numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes. / Ozcer, Isik A.; Baruzzi, Guido S.; Reid, Thomas; Habashi, Wagdi G.; Fossati, Marco; Croce, Giulio.

2011. Paper presented at SAE 2011 International Conference on Aircraft and Engine Icing and Ground Deicing, Chicago, IL, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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T2 - numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes

AU - Ozcer, Isik A.

AU - Baruzzi, Guido S.

AU - Reid, Thomas

AU - Habashi, Wagdi G.

AU - Fossati, Marco

AU - Croce, Giulio

PY - 2011/12/1

Y1 - 2011/12/1

N2 - Numerically predicted roughness distributions obtained in in-flight icing simulations with a beading model are used in a quasi-steady manner to compute ice shapes. This approach, called "Multishot", uses a number of steady flow and droplet solutions for computing short intervals (shots) of the total ice accretion time. The iced geometry, the grid, and the surface roughness distribution are updated after each shot, producing a better match with the unsteady ice accretion phenomena. Comparisons to multishot results with uniform roughness show that the evolution of the surface roughness distribution has a strong influence on the final ice shape. The ice horns that form are longer and thinner compared to constant roughness results. The constant roughness approach usually fails to capture the formation of the pressure side horns and under-predicts the thickness of the ice in this region. With the variable roughness produced by the beading model, the ice shape in general is captured more accurately, better matching the experimental ice shapes. Results are provided for NACA 0012 and SC 1095 airfoils for 2D icing. The flow conditions range between Mach numbers of 0.3 to 0.6, free stream static temperatures of -27°C to -6°C, free stream liquid water contents of 0.5g/m3 to 1.4 g/m3, Reynolds numbers of 2.6 to 4.4 million, and droplet diameter of 20 microns. Total ice accretion times range between 45 seconds to 7 minutes. The FENSAP-ICE icing simulation system is utilized to carry out the CFD-Icing calculations in 2D and 3D.

AB - Numerically predicted roughness distributions obtained in in-flight icing simulations with a beading model are used in a quasi-steady manner to compute ice shapes. This approach, called "Multishot", uses a number of steady flow and droplet solutions for computing short intervals (shots) of the total ice accretion time. The iced geometry, the grid, and the surface roughness distribution are updated after each shot, producing a better match with the unsteady ice accretion phenomena. Comparisons to multishot results with uniform roughness show that the evolution of the surface roughness distribution has a strong influence on the final ice shape. The ice horns that form are longer and thinner compared to constant roughness results. The constant roughness approach usually fails to capture the formation of the pressure side horns and under-predicts the thickness of the ice in this region. With the variable roughness produced by the beading model, the ice shape in general is captured more accurately, better matching the experimental ice shapes. Results are provided for NACA 0012 and SC 1095 airfoils for 2D icing. The flow conditions range between Mach numbers of 0.3 to 0.6, free stream static temperatures of -27°C to -6°C, free stream liquid water contents of 0.5g/m3 to 1.4 g/m3, Reynolds numbers of 2.6 to 4.4 million, and droplet diameter of 20 microns. Total ice accretion times range between 45 seconds to 7 minutes. The FENSAP-ICE icing simulation system is utilized to carry out the CFD-Icing calculations in 2D and 3D.

KW - airfoils

KW - computer simulation

KW - density measurement (optical)

KW - drops

KW - Mach number

KW - Reynolds number

KW - surface roughness

KW - droplet diameters

KW - flow conditions

KW - free stream

KW - ice accretion

KW - icing simulation

KW - inflight icing

KW - liquid water content

KW - numerical predictions

KW - pressure side

KW - quasi-steady

KW - roughness distributions

KW - roughness evolution

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U2 - 10.4271/2011-38-0024

DO - 10.4271/2011-38-0024

M3 - Paper

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Ozcer IA, Baruzzi GS, Reid T, Habashi WG, Fossati M, Croce G. FENSAP-ICE: numerical prediction of ice roughness evolution, and its effects on ice shapes. 2011. Paper presented at SAE 2011 International Conference on Aircraft and Engine Icing and Ground Deicing, Chicago, IL, United States. https://doi.org/10.4271/2011-38-0024