Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems

L.A. Cardoza, C.W. Knapp, C.K. Larive, J.B. Belden, M. Lydy, D.W. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ciprofloxacin (cipro) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine that is readily transported into the environment via domestic wastewaters and through direct runoff. Although factors governing cipro fate are becoming understood, an integrated evaluation of disappearance mechanisms in aquatic systems has not been performed. Here we examined cipro disappearance rate in surface waters using both laboratory and field systems under different light, and dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) conditions to determine when photodegradation versus adsorption dominates cipro fate. Initial laboratory experiments showed that cipro rapidly photodegraded (t(1/2) ∼ 1.5 h) with numerous photodegradation products being noted when POC levels were low. However, even moderate water column POC levels resulted in reduced photodegradation ( no breakdown products detected) and soluble cipro disappearance rates were accelerated. C-14-ciprofloxacin studies confirmed significant adsorption onto aquatic POC (KOC values of 13,900 to 20,500 L/kg at neutral pH). In contrast, a follow-up mesocosm-scale field study using low POC water showed that photodegradation could also dominate cipro fate. In conclusion, both adsorption and photodegradation strongly influence cipro fate in aquatic systems, although the dominant mechanism appears to depend upon the ambient POC level.
LanguageEnglish
Pages383-398
Number of pages16
JournalWater, Air, and Soil Pollution
Volume161
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

Fingerprint

particulate organic carbon
Ciprofloxacin
Organic carbon
Photodegradation
photodegradation
adsorption
Adsorption
Veterinary medicine
mesocosm
Antibiotics
Runoff
Surface waters
antibiotics
dissolved organic carbon
Water
Wastewater
water column
runoff
surface water
wastewater

Keywords

  • aquatic systems
  • ciprofloxacin
  • field mesocosm
  • fluoroquinolone antibiotics
  • particulate organic carbon
  • photodegradation
  • chemistry

Cite this

Cardoza, L. A., Knapp, C. W., Larive, C. K., Belden, J. B., Lydy, M., & Graham, D. W. (2005). Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems. Water, Air, and Soil Pollution , 161(1-4), 383-398. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11270-005-5550-6
Cardoza, L.A. ; Knapp, C.W. ; Larive, C.K. ; Belden, J.B. ; Lydy, M. ; Graham, D.W. / Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems. In: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution . 2005 ; Vol. 161, No. 1-4. pp. 383-398.
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Cardoza, LA, Knapp, CW, Larive, CK, Belden, JB, Lydy, M & Graham, DW 2005, 'Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems' Water, Air, and Soil Pollution , vol. 161, no. 1-4, pp. 383-398. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11270-005-5550-6

Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems. / Cardoza, L.A.; Knapp, C.W.; Larive, C.K.; Belden, J.B.; Lydy, M.; Graham, D.W.

In: Water, Air, and Soil Pollution , Vol. 161, No. 1-4, 02.2005, p. 383-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting the fate of ciprofloxacin in aquatic field systems

AU - Cardoza, L.A.

AU - Knapp, C.W.

AU - Larive, C.K.

AU - Belden, J.B.

AU - Lydy, M.

AU - Graham, D.W.

PY - 2005/2

Y1 - 2005/2

N2 - Ciprofloxacin (cipro) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine that is readily transported into the environment via domestic wastewaters and through direct runoff. Although factors governing cipro fate are becoming understood, an integrated evaluation of disappearance mechanisms in aquatic systems has not been performed. Here we examined cipro disappearance rate in surface waters using both laboratory and field systems under different light, and dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) conditions to determine when photodegradation versus adsorption dominates cipro fate. Initial laboratory experiments showed that cipro rapidly photodegraded (t(1/2) ∼ 1.5 h) with numerous photodegradation products being noted when POC levels were low. However, even moderate water column POC levels resulted in reduced photodegradation ( no breakdown products detected) and soluble cipro disappearance rates were accelerated. C-14-ciprofloxacin studies confirmed significant adsorption onto aquatic POC (KOC values of 13,900 to 20,500 L/kg at neutral pH). In contrast, a follow-up mesocosm-scale field study using low POC water showed that photodegradation could also dominate cipro fate. In conclusion, both adsorption and photodegradation strongly influence cipro fate in aquatic systems, although the dominant mechanism appears to depend upon the ambient POC level.

AB - Ciprofloxacin (cipro) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in human and veterinary medicine that is readily transported into the environment via domestic wastewaters and through direct runoff. Although factors governing cipro fate are becoming understood, an integrated evaluation of disappearance mechanisms in aquatic systems has not been performed. Here we examined cipro disappearance rate in surface waters using both laboratory and field systems under different light, and dissolved (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) conditions to determine when photodegradation versus adsorption dominates cipro fate. Initial laboratory experiments showed that cipro rapidly photodegraded (t(1/2) ∼ 1.5 h) with numerous photodegradation products being noted when POC levels were low. However, even moderate water column POC levels resulted in reduced photodegradation ( no breakdown products detected) and soluble cipro disappearance rates were accelerated. C-14-ciprofloxacin studies confirmed significant adsorption onto aquatic POC (KOC values of 13,900 to 20,500 L/kg at neutral pH). In contrast, a follow-up mesocosm-scale field study using low POC water showed that photodegradation could also dominate cipro fate. In conclusion, both adsorption and photodegradation strongly influence cipro fate in aquatic systems, although the dominant mechanism appears to depend upon the ambient POC level.

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KW - ciprofloxacin

KW - field mesocosm

KW - fluoroquinolone antibiotics

KW - particulate organic carbon

KW - photodegradation

KW - chemistry

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U2 - 10.1007/s11270-005-5550-6

DO - 10.1007/s11270-005-5550-6

M3 - Article

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JF - Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

SN - 0049-6979

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