Exploring the hardwired for news hypothesis: how threat proximity affects the cognitive and emotional processing of health-related print news

Kevin Wise, Petya Eckler, Anastasia Kononova, Jeremy Littau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored how the proximity of threatening health news affects cognition and emotion through a 2 (Proximity: High=Low)4 (Topic) fractional experiment. Fifty-one participants read four news stories about either local or distant health threats, with their heart rate, skin conductance, and corrugator electromyography recorded. Results showed that high-proximity health threats elicited greater heart rate deceleration than did lowproximity health threats, indicating greater allocation of automatic resources to encoding
high-proximity threats. Recognition data demonstrated that details from high-proximity health threats were recognized more accurately than details from low-proximity health threats. There were no significant effects of proximity on either skin conductance levels or corrugator activation. These results are discussed in terms of Shoemaker’s (1996) hardwired for news hypothesis and A. Lang’s (2000, 2006) limited capacity model.
LanguageEnglish
Pages268-287
Number of pages20
JournalCommunication Studies
Volume60
Issue number3
Early online date1 Jul 2009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009

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news
Health
threat
Processing
health
Skin
Electromyography
Deceleration
activation
Threat
Proximity
Emotion
News
cognition
emotion
Chemical activation
experiment
resources
Experiments
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • cognition
  • emotion
  • health news
  • proximity
  • psychophysiology

Cite this

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Exploring the hardwired for news hypothesis : how threat proximity affects the cognitive and emotional processing of health-related print news. / Wise, Kevin; Eckler, Petya; Kononova, Anastasia; Littau, Jeremy.

In: Communication Studies, Vol. 60, No. 3, 07.2009, p. 268-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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