Exploring behaviour in the online environment : student perceptions of information literacy

Janice Smith, Martin Oliver

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The aim of this paper is to show how information literacy can be conceptualised as a key learning process related to discipline and academic maturity, rather than as a generic skill. Results of a smallscale study including questionnaires and observation of student behaviour are reported and analysed in relation to Bruce's 'seven faces of information literacy' framework. The findings illustrate that information literacy is a highly situated practice that remains undeveloped through mandatory schooling. Some methodological issues are considered in relation to researching information literacy, including the limits of the Bruce model as a framework for analysis. We also show how decontextualised courses can foreground and privilege certain behaviours that are beneficial but that developing higher-level information literate attitudes is likely to be an iterative and contextualised process.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages49-65
    Number of pages16
    JournalResearch in Learning Technology
    Volume13
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 May 2007

    Fingerprint

    literacy
    Students
    student
    maturity
    privilege
    learning process
    questionnaire

    Keywords

    • education
    • online learning
    • information literacy
    • information and communications technology

    Cite this

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    Exploring behaviour in the online environment : student perceptions of information literacy. / Smith, Janice; Oliver, Martin.

    In: Research in Learning Technology, Vol. 13, No. 1, 02.05.2007, p. 49-65.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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