Experimental systems for studying the role of G-protein-coupled receptors in receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction

Nigel J Pyne, Catherine Waters, Noreen Akhtar Moughal, Balwinder Sambi, Michelle Connell, Susan Pyne

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Early conception of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways was that each represented distinct and linear modules that converged on downstream targets, such as p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). It has now become clear that this is not the case and that multiple levels of cross-talk exist between both receptor systems at early points during signaling events. In recent years, it has become apparent that transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases by GPCR agonists is a general phenomenon that has been demonstrated for many unrelated GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases. In this case, GPCR/G-protein participation is upstream of the receptor tyrosine kinase. However, evidence now demonstrates that numerous growth factors use G proteins and associated signaling molecules such as beta-arrestins that participate downstream of the receptor tyrosine kinase to signal to effectors, such as p42/p44 MAPK. This article highlights experimental approaches used to investigate this novel mechanism of cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases and GPCRs.
LanguageEnglish
Pages451-475
Number of pages25
JournalMethods in Enzmology
Volume390
Early online date18 Oct 2004
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Signal transduction
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Signal Transduction
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
GTP-Binding Proteins
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1
Arrestins
G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases
Receptor Cross-Talk
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Transcriptional Activation
Molecules

Keywords

  • animals
  • arrestins
  • cell line
  • humans
  • mitogen-activated protein kinases
  • pertussis toxin
  • phosphorylation
  • receptor protein-tyrosine Kinases
  • receptor, nerve growth factor
  • receptor, platelet-derived Growth Factor beta
  • receptors, G-protein-coupled
  • receptors, lysosphingolipid
  • signal transduction
  • tyrosine
  • tyrphostins

Cite this

Pyne, Nigel J ; Waters, Catherine ; Moughal, Noreen Akhtar ; Sambi, Balwinder ; Connell, Michelle ; Pyne, Susan. / Experimental systems for studying the role of G-protein-coupled receptors in receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction. In: Methods in Enzmology. 2004 ; Vol. 390. pp. 451-475.
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abstract = "Early conception of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways was that each represented distinct and linear modules that converged on downstream targets, such as p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). It has now become clear that this is not the case and that multiple levels of cross-talk exist between both receptor systems at early points during signaling events. In recent years, it has become apparent that transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases by GPCR agonists is a general phenomenon that has been demonstrated for many unrelated GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases. In this case, GPCR/G-protein participation is upstream of the receptor tyrosine kinase. However, evidence now demonstrates that numerous growth factors use G proteins and associated signaling molecules such as beta-arrestins that participate downstream of the receptor tyrosine kinase to signal to effectors, such as p42/p44 MAPK. This article highlights experimental approaches used to investigate this novel mechanism of cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases and GPCRs.",
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Experimental systems for studying the role of G-protein-coupled receptors in receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction. / Pyne, Nigel J; Waters, Catherine; Moughal, Noreen Akhtar; Sambi, Balwinder; Connell, Michelle; Pyne, Susan.

In: Methods in Enzmology, Vol. 390, 2004, p. 451-475.

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issue

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experimental systems for studying the role of G-protein-coupled receptors in receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction

AU - Pyne, Nigel J

AU - Waters, Catherine

AU - Moughal, Noreen Akhtar

AU - Sambi, Balwinder

AU - Connell, Michelle

AU - Pyne, Susan

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AB - Early conception of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways was that each represented distinct and linear modules that converged on downstream targets, such as p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). It has now become clear that this is not the case and that multiple levels of cross-talk exist between both receptor systems at early points during signaling events. In recent years, it has become apparent that transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases by GPCR agonists is a general phenomenon that has been demonstrated for many unrelated GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases. In this case, GPCR/G-protein participation is upstream of the receptor tyrosine kinase. However, evidence now demonstrates that numerous growth factors use G proteins and associated signaling molecules such as beta-arrestins that participate downstream of the receptor tyrosine kinase to signal to effectors, such as p42/p44 MAPK. This article highlights experimental approaches used to investigate this novel mechanism of cross-talk between receptor tyrosine kinases and GPCRs.

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