Excited state kinetics of Ru(bpy)2(PVP)10 2+

Lynn Dennany, Robert J. Forster

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

Abstract

The creation of cascade processes, e.g., triggering the quenching of multiple luminescent centers in response to quenching at a single site, is an important amplification approach for sensing biomolecules with specificity and high sensitivity. Two processes can be important contributors to super quenching within luminescent polymers (1). First, a single acceptor may quench the fluorescence emission from an entire macromolecule in aqueous solution. Second, where the luminescent polymer is charged, a weakly bound complex between the polyelectrolyte and quencher may form enabling static super quenching. Polymers labelled with ruthenium polypyridyl complexes represent attractive systems for exploring super quenching because emission from the metalto-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states of Run can be probed with great sensitivity (2).

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationChemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium
EditorsC. Bruckner-Lea, G. Hunter, N. Miura, P. Vanysek, M. Egashira, F. Mizutani
Pages319-321
Number of pages3
Volume8
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2004
EventChemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium - Honolulu, HI, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Oct 20048 Oct 2004

Conference

ConferenceChemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityHonolulu, HI
Period3/10/048/10/04

Fingerprint

Excited states
Quenching
Kinetics
Polymers
Ruthenium
Biomolecules
Polyelectrolytes
Macromolecules
Amplification
Charge transfer
Fluorescence
Ligands
bis(bipyridyl)ruthenium(II)

Keywords

  • biopolymers
  • charge transfer
  • crystallization
  • cyclic voltammetry
  • fluorescence
  • luminescence
  • quenching
  • excited state kinetics
  • ruthenium

Cite this

Dennany, L., & Forster, R. J. (2004). Excited state kinetics of Ru(bpy)2(PVP)10 2+. In C. Bruckner-Lea, G. Hunter, N. Miura, P. Vanysek, M. Egashira, & F. Mizutani (Eds.), Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium (Vol. 8, pp. 319-321)
Dennany, Lynn ; Forster, Robert J. / Excited state kinetics of Ru(bpy)2(PVP)10 2+. Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium. editor / C. Bruckner-Lea ; G. Hunter ; N. Miura ; P. Vanysek ; M. Egashira ; F. Mizutani. Vol. 8 2004. pp. 319-321
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Dennany, L & Forster, RJ 2004, Excited state kinetics of Ru(bpy)2(PVP)10 2+. in C Bruckner-Lea, G Hunter, N Miura, P Vanysek, M Egashira & F Mizutani (eds), Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium. vol. 8, pp. 319-321, Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium, Honolulu, HI, United Kingdom, 3/10/04.

Excited state kinetics of Ru(bpy)2(PVP)10 2+. / Dennany, Lynn; Forster, Robert J.

Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium. ed. / C. Bruckner-Lea; G. Hunter; N. Miura; P. Vanysek; M. Egashira; F. Mizutani. Vol. 8 2004. p. 319-321.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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N2 - The creation of cascade processes, e.g., triggering the quenching of multiple luminescent centers in response to quenching at a single site, is an important amplification approach for sensing biomolecules with specificity and high sensitivity. Two processes can be important contributors to super quenching within luminescent polymers (1). First, a single acceptor may quench the fluorescence emission from an entire macromolecule in aqueous solution. Second, where the luminescent polymer is charged, a weakly bound complex between the polyelectrolyte and quencher may form enabling static super quenching. Polymers labelled with ruthenium polypyridyl complexes represent attractive systems for exploring super quenching because emission from the metalto-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states of Run can be probed with great sensitivity (2).

AB - The creation of cascade processes, e.g., triggering the quenching of multiple luminescent centers in response to quenching at a single site, is an important amplification approach for sensing biomolecules with specificity and high sensitivity. Two processes can be important contributors to super quenching within luminescent polymers (1). First, a single acceptor may quench the fluorescence emission from an entire macromolecule in aqueous solution. Second, where the luminescent polymer is charged, a weakly bound complex between the polyelectrolyte and quencher may form enabling static super quenching. Polymers labelled with ruthenium polypyridyl complexes represent attractive systems for exploring super quenching because emission from the metalto-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited states of Run can be probed with great sensitivity (2).

KW - biopolymers

KW - charge transfer

KW - crystallization

KW - cyclic voltammetry

KW - fluorescence

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BT - Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium

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Dennany L, Forster RJ. Excited state kinetics of Ru(bpy)2(PVP)10 2+. In Bruckner-Lea C, Hunter G, Miura N, Vanysek P, Egashira M, Mizutani F, editors, Chemical Sensors VI: Chemical and Biological Sensors and Analytical Methods - Proceedings of the International Symposium. Vol. 8. 2004. p. 319-321