Examining the Role of Parents in Intervention for Speech Sound Disorders

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

Speech sound disorders (SSD) are among the most common childhood communication disorders. Timely and effective intervention, ideally delivered 2-3 times per week by a speech pathologist (SLP) for at least 30 sessions, is crucial. Unfortunately, many children cannot access treatment at this intensity. This thesis presents findings from five studies to examine the role of parents in overcoming this intensity shortfall. The first study (a review of the evidence base and survey of current clinical practice) confirmed that children with SSD receive insufficient intensities of treatment. The second study reviewed the evidence for parent involvement in intervention for SSD and concluded that SLPs do not have a clear nor comprehensive evidence base to guide clinical decisions when involving parents. The third study (a survey) confirmed that SLPs engage parents to overcome intensity shortfalls and highlighted the need for more research investigating how to best involve parents in treatment for SSD. In the fourth study, six parents of children with SSD were interviewed about their experiences of being involved in intervention. These parents valued the experience, but needed support from their SLP to overcome challenges. The findings from these four studies informed an intervention study—the fifth study presented in this thesis—investigating the outcomes following SLP and parent-delivered intervention for SSD. In a single-case experimental study, five children received treatment using an established treatment approach that was delivered by both an SLP and a parent. All participants responded to treatment but with different levels of generalisation. Collectively, the research presented in this thesis highlights the important role that parents play in intervention for SSD. This thesis argues for further consideration of intervention intensity, motor learning, and treatment fidelity in intervention for SSD.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationPhD
Awarding Institution
  • University of Sydney
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Baker, Elise, Supervisor, External person
  • Munro, Natalie, Supervisor, External person
  • Williams, A. Lynn, Supervisor, External person
  • Trivette, Carol, Supervisor, External person
Place of PublicationSydney
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Parents
Therapeutics
Communication Disorders
Speech Sound Disorder
Research
Learning

Keywords

  • speech pathology
  • speech sound disorders
  • intervention
  • parents
  • service delivery

Cite this

@phdthesis{aa721ff46bcf4e86a530ae5966d16a99,
title = "Examining the Role of Parents in Intervention for Speech Sound Disorders",
abstract = "Speech sound disorders (SSD) are among the most common childhood communication disorders. Timely and effective intervention, ideally delivered 2-3 times per week by a speech pathologist (SLP) for at least 30 sessions, is crucial. Unfortunately, many children cannot access treatment at this intensity. This thesis presents findings from five studies to examine the role of parents in overcoming this intensity shortfall. The first study (a review of the evidence base and survey of current clinical practice) confirmed that children with SSD receive insufficient intensities of treatment. The second study reviewed the evidence for parent involvement in intervention for SSD and concluded that SLPs do not have a clear nor comprehensive evidence base to guide clinical decisions when involving parents. The third study (a survey) confirmed that SLPs engage parents to overcome intensity shortfalls and highlighted the need for more research investigating how to best involve parents in treatment for SSD. In the fourth study, six parents of children with SSD were interviewed about their experiences of being involved in intervention. These parents valued the experience, but needed support from their SLP to overcome challenges. The findings from these four studies informed an intervention study—the fifth study presented in this thesis—investigating the outcomes following SLP and parent-delivered intervention for SSD. In a single-case experimental study, five children received treatment using an established treatment approach that was delivered by both an SLP and a parent. All participants responded to treatment but with different levels of generalisation. Collectively, the research presented in this thesis highlights the important role that parents play in intervention for SSD. This thesis argues for further consideration of intervention intensity, motor learning, and treatment fidelity in intervention for SSD.",
keywords = "speech pathology, speech sound disorders, intervention, parents, service delivery",
author = "Sugden, {Eleanor Kate}",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
publisher = "University of Sydney",
address = "Australia",
school = "University of Sydney",

}

Examining the Role of Parents in Intervention for Speech Sound Disorders. / Sugden, Eleanor Kate.

Sydney : University of Sydney, 2018. 444 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - Examining the Role of Parents in Intervention for Speech Sound Disorders

AU - Sugden, Eleanor Kate

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Speech sound disorders (SSD) are among the most common childhood communication disorders. Timely and effective intervention, ideally delivered 2-3 times per week by a speech pathologist (SLP) for at least 30 sessions, is crucial. Unfortunately, many children cannot access treatment at this intensity. This thesis presents findings from five studies to examine the role of parents in overcoming this intensity shortfall. The first study (a review of the evidence base and survey of current clinical practice) confirmed that children with SSD receive insufficient intensities of treatment. The second study reviewed the evidence for parent involvement in intervention for SSD and concluded that SLPs do not have a clear nor comprehensive evidence base to guide clinical decisions when involving parents. The third study (a survey) confirmed that SLPs engage parents to overcome intensity shortfalls and highlighted the need for more research investigating how to best involve parents in treatment for SSD. In the fourth study, six parents of children with SSD were interviewed about their experiences of being involved in intervention. These parents valued the experience, but needed support from their SLP to overcome challenges. The findings from these four studies informed an intervention study—the fifth study presented in this thesis—investigating the outcomes following SLP and parent-delivered intervention for SSD. In a single-case experimental study, five children received treatment using an established treatment approach that was delivered by both an SLP and a parent. All participants responded to treatment but with different levels of generalisation. Collectively, the research presented in this thesis highlights the important role that parents play in intervention for SSD. This thesis argues for further consideration of intervention intensity, motor learning, and treatment fidelity in intervention for SSD.

AB - Speech sound disorders (SSD) are among the most common childhood communication disorders. Timely and effective intervention, ideally delivered 2-3 times per week by a speech pathologist (SLP) for at least 30 sessions, is crucial. Unfortunately, many children cannot access treatment at this intensity. This thesis presents findings from five studies to examine the role of parents in overcoming this intensity shortfall. The first study (a review of the evidence base and survey of current clinical practice) confirmed that children with SSD receive insufficient intensities of treatment. The second study reviewed the evidence for parent involvement in intervention for SSD and concluded that SLPs do not have a clear nor comprehensive evidence base to guide clinical decisions when involving parents. The third study (a survey) confirmed that SLPs engage parents to overcome intensity shortfalls and highlighted the need for more research investigating how to best involve parents in treatment for SSD. In the fourth study, six parents of children with SSD were interviewed about their experiences of being involved in intervention. These parents valued the experience, but needed support from their SLP to overcome challenges. The findings from these four studies informed an intervention study—the fifth study presented in this thesis—investigating the outcomes following SLP and parent-delivered intervention for SSD. In a single-case experimental study, five children received treatment using an established treatment approach that was delivered by both an SLP and a parent. All participants responded to treatment but with different levels of generalisation. Collectively, the research presented in this thesis highlights the important role that parents play in intervention for SSD. This thesis argues for further consideration of intervention intensity, motor learning, and treatment fidelity in intervention for SSD.

KW - speech pathology

KW - speech sound disorders

KW - intervention

KW - parents

KW - service delivery

UR - http://hdl.handle.net/2123/18132

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

PB - University of Sydney

CY - Sydney

ER -