Examining the Effectiveness of Support for UK Wave Energy Innovation since 2000: Lost at Sea or a New Wave of Innovation?

Matthew Hannon, Renée van Diemen, Jim Skea

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

Almost 20 years after the UK’s first wave energy innovation programme came to an end in the 1980s, a new programme to accelerate the development of wave energy technology was launched. It was believed that wave energy could play a central role in helping to deliver a low-carbon, secure and affordable energy system, as well as provide an important boost to the UK economy through the growth of a new domestic industry. However, despite almost £200m of public funds being invested in UK wave energy innovation since 2000, wave energy technology remains some distance away from commercialisation. Consequently, this report examines the extent to which the failure to deliver a commercially viable wave energy device can be attributed to weaknesses in both government and industry’s support for wave energy innovation in the UK.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages164
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2017

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Innovation
Energy
Energy technology
Industry
Carbon
Commercialization
Government
Energy systems

Keywords

  • wave energy
  • energy policy
  • marine energy
  • renewable energy systems
  • United Kingdom
  • low carbon
  • climate change
  • Innovation
  • Scotland

Cite this

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title = "Examining the Effectiveness of Support for UK Wave Energy Innovation since 2000: Lost at Sea or a New Wave of Innovation?",
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Examining the Effectiveness of Support for UK Wave Energy Innovation since 2000 : Lost at Sea or a New Wave of Innovation? / Hannon, Matthew; van Diemen, Renée; Skea, Jim.

Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2017. 164 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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