Examination of anticipated chemical shift and shape distortion effect on materials commonly used in prosthetic socket fabrication when measured using MRI: a validation study

Mohmmad Reza Safari Kelayeh, Philip Rowe, Adrianus Buis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98%) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30%], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03%], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/–2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages31-42
    Number of pages12
    JournalJournal of Rehabilitiation Research and Development
    Volume50
    Issue number1
    Early online date9 Sep 2012
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

    Fingerprint

    Validation Studies
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Copper Sulfate
    Glass
    Extremities
    Calcium Sulfate
    Water
    Silicones
    Artifacts
    Plastics
    Lower Extremity
    Technology

    Keywords

    • accuracy
    • casting
    • chemical shift
    • MRI
    • prosthesis
    • prosthetic socket
    • residual limb
    • residual limb volume,
    • shape distorsion
    • socket material

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The quality of lower-limb prosthetic socket fit is influenced by shape and volume consistency during the residual limb shape-capturing process (i.e., casting). Casting can be quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. However, chemical shift artifact and image distortion may influence the accuracy of MRI when common socket/casting materials are used. We used a purpose-designed rig to examine seven different materials commonly used in socket fabrication during exposure to MRI. The rig incorporated glass marker tubes filled with water doped with 1 g/L copper sulfate (CS) and 9 plastic sample vials (film containers) to hold the specific material specimens. The specimens were scanned 9 times in different configurations. The absolute mean difference of the glass marker tube length was 1.39 mm (2.98{\%}) (minimum = 0.13 mm [0.30{\%}], maximum = 5.47 mm [14.03{\%}], standard deviation = 0.89 mm). The absolute shift for all materials was <1.7 mm. This was less than the measurement tolerance of +/–2.18 mm based on voxel (three-dimensional pixel) dimensions. The results show that MRI is an accurate and repeatable method for dimensional measurement when using matter containing water. Additionally, silicone and plaster of paris plus 1 g/L CS do not show a significant shape distortion nor do they interfere with the MRI image of the residual limb.",
    keywords = "accuracy, casting, chemical shift, MRI, prosthesis, prosthetic socket, residual limb, residual limb volume, , shape distorsion, socket material",
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