Evaluation of the impact of excipients and an albendazole salt on albendazole concentrations in upper small intestine using an in vitro biorelevant gastrointestinal transfer (BioGIT) system

Alexandros Kourentas, Maria Vertzoni, Ibrahim Khadra, Mira Symillides, Hugh Clark, Gavin Halbert, James Butler, Christos Reppas

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Abstract

An in vitro biorelevant gastrointestinal transfer (BioGIT) system was assessed for its ability to mimic recently reported albendazole concentrations in human upper small intestine after administration of free base suspensions to fasted adults in absence and in presence of supersaturation promoting excipients (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and lipid self-emulsifying vehicles). The in vitro method was also used to evaluate the likely impact of using the sulfate salt on albendazole concentrations in upper small intestine. In addition, BioGIT data were compared with equilibrium solubility data of the salt and the free base in human aspirates and biorelevant media. The BioGIT system adequately simulated the average albendazole gastrointestinal transfer process and concentrations in upper small intestine after administration of the free base suspensions to fasted adults. However, the degree of supersaturation observed in the duodenal compartment was greater than in vivo. Albendazole sulfate resulted in minimal increase of albendazole concentrations in the duodenal compartment of the BioGIT, despite improved equilibrium solubility observed in human aspirates and biorelevant media, indicating that the use of a salt is unlikely to lead to any significant oral absorption advantage for albendazole.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2896-2903
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Volume105
Issue number9
Early online date30 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2016

Keywords

  • BioGIT
  • gastrointestinal transfer
  • dissolution
  • supersaturation
  • poorly soluble weak base
  • albendazole salts
  • lipid excipients
  • precipitation inhibitor
  • HPMC E5

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