Evaluation of Pharmacy Teams in GP Practice

Derek Stewart, Marion Bennie, Katie MacLure, Rosemary Newham, Scott Cunningham, Rachel Bruce, Katherine Gibson Smith, Sarah Fry, Andrew MacLure, James MacKerrow

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

In Scotland, and globally, public health systems are coming under increasing pressures due to several complex and inter-related factors, including the lack of capacity within the primary care workforce and an expanding population of older people. Older people often have multiple conditions and the associated increase in medicines use and healthcare appointments has led to an overwhelming medicines and healthcare service burden; adversely impacting patients’ quality of life and access to primary care services. A key element of the Scottish response is the better integration and transformation of our health and social care services, and a shift in the balance of care from hospital to the community setting.1 This direction of travel has brought focus to primary care, the challenges and pressures facing frontline practitioners and the need to transform services through building broader multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). The clinical leadership community has shaped and endorsed the 2020 Vision for our public services with clear policy direction and supporting policy documents: Achieving Excellence in Pharmaceutical Care – a Strategy for Scotland (2017) commits to “Integrating pharmacists with advanced clinical skills and pharmacy technicians in GP Practices to improve pharmaceutical care and contribute to the multidisciplinary team2, and, Practicing Realistic Medicine (2018), states that “by 2025, everyone who provides healthcare in Scotland will demonstrate their professionalism through the approaches, behaviours and attitudes of Realistic Medicine”.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Commissioning bodyScottish Government
Number of pages150
Publication statusPublished - 30 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Scotland
Delivery of Health Care
Primary Health Care
Pharmaceutical Services
State Medicine
Choice Behavior
Pressure
Clinical Competence
Response Elements
Social Work
Pharmacists
Appointments and Schedules
Public Health
Quality of Life
Medicine
Population
Direction compound

Keywords

  • general practice
  • pharmacists
  • pharmacy team

Cite this

Stewart, D., Bennie, M., MacLure, K., Newham, R., Cunningham, S., Bruce, R., ... MacKerrow, J. (2018). Evaluation of Pharmacy Teams in GP Practice. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde.
Stewart, Derek ; Bennie, Marion ; MacLure, Katie ; Newham, Rosemary ; Cunningham, Scott ; Bruce, Rachel ; Smith, Katherine Gibson ; Fry, Sarah ; MacLure, Andrew ; MacKerrow, James. / Evaluation of Pharmacy Teams in GP Practice. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2018. 150 p.
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Stewart, D, Bennie, M, MacLure, K, Newham, R, Cunningham, S, Bruce, R, Smith, KG, Fry, S, MacLure, A & MacKerrow, J 2018, Evaluation of Pharmacy Teams in GP Practice. University of Strathclyde, Glasgow.

Evaluation of Pharmacy Teams in GP Practice. / Stewart, Derek; Bennie, Marion; MacLure, Katie; Newham, Rosemary; Cunningham, Scott; Bruce, Rachel; Smith, Katherine Gibson; Fry, Sarah; MacLure, Andrew; MacKerrow, James.

Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2018. 150 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

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Stewart D, Bennie M, MacLure K, Newham R, Cunningham S, Bruce R et al. Evaluation of Pharmacy Teams in GP Practice. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde, 2018. 150 p.