Evaluation of parent and speech-language pathologist delivered multiple oppositions intervention for children with phonological impairment: a multiple-baseline design study

Eleanor Sugden, Elise Baker, A. Lynn Williams, Natalie Munro, Carol M. Trivette

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Abstract

Purpose: Evidence for the multiple oppositions intervention approach indicates it should be delivered 3 × weekly; however, this high dose frequency is not provided by many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) worldwide. This study investigated whether parents could be involved in delivering phonological intervention to fulfil this intensity shortfall.
Method: Five children with moderate to severe phonological impairment aged 3;3-5;11 years and one of their parents participated in this study using a multiple baselines across participants design. Participants attended 1 × 60-minute clinic-based session per week for 8 weeks and parents completed home practice 2 × per week over this period after receiving training. Parents also attended a 60-minute training session prior to commencing intervention.
Results: All children showed a treatment effect to treated words. Three of the five children demonstrated a large effect size for generalization to non-treatment words, with one child demonstrating a moderate effect, and one child demonstrating no effect. However, all children showed qualitative changes to their speech system. Three of the five children experienced significant changes to communicative participation. Measures of treatment fidelity indicated that parents were able to competently deliver the intervention both within the clinic and at home.
Conclusions: Combined parent and SLP-delivered multiple oppositions intervention is effective for some children with moderate to severe phonological impairment. The findings indicate that parents can be trained to competently and confidently deliver phonological intervention. Further evidence is needed to identify optimal child and parent characteristics most suited to this modified service delivery approach.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-126
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume29
Issue number1
Early online date25 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Feb 2020

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Articulation Disorders
parents
opposition
Language
language
Parents
evaluation
Pathologists
evidence

Keywords

  • phonological impairment
  • children
  • multiple oppositions intervention approach
  • speech sound disorders

Cite this

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title = "Evaluation of parent and speech-language pathologist delivered multiple oppositions intervention for children with phonological impairment: a multiple-baseline design study",
abstract = "Purpose: Evidence for the multiple oppositions intervention approach indicates it should be delivered 3 × weekly; however, this high dose frequency is not provided by many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) worldwide. This study investigated whether parents could be involved in delivering phonological intervention to fulfil this intensity shortfall.Method: Five children with moderate to severe phonological impairment aged 3;3-5;11 years and one of their parents participated in this study using a multiple baselines across participants design. Participants attended 1 × 60-minute clinic-based session per week for 8 weeks and parents completed home practice 2 × per week over this period after receiving training. Parents also attended a 60-minute training session prior to commencing intervention.Results: All children showed a treatment effect to treated words. Three of the five children demonstrated a large effect size for generalization to non-treatment words, with one child demonstrating a moderate effect, and one child demonstrating no effect. However, all children showed qualitative changes to their speech system. Three of the five children experienced significant changes to communicative participation. Measures of treatment fidelity indicated that parents were able to competently deliver the intervention both within the clinic and at home. Conclusions: Combined parent and SLP-delivered multiple oppositions intervention is effective for some children with moderate to severe phonological impairment. The findings indicate that parents can be trained to competently and confidently deliver phonological intervention. Further evidence is needed to identify optimal child and parent characteristics most suited to this modified service delivery approach.",
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Evaluation of parent and speech-language pathologist delivered multiple oppositions intervention for children with phonological impairment : a multiple-baseline design study. / Sugden, Eleanor; Baker, Elise; Williams, A. Lynn; Munro, Natalie; Trivette, Carol M.

In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 29, No. 1, 07.02.2020, p. 111-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Purpose: Evidence for the multiple oppositions intervention approach indicates it should be delivered 3 × weekly; however, this high dose frequency is not provided by many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) worldwide. This study investigated whether parents could be involved in delivering phonological intervention to fulfil this intensity shortfall.Method: Five children with moderate to severe phonological impairment aged 3;3-5;11 years and one of their parents participated in this study using a multiple baselines across participants design. Participants attended 1 × 60-minute clinic-based session per week for 8 weeks and parents completed home practice 2 × per week over this period after receiving training. Parents also attended a 60-minute training session prior to commencing intervention.Results: All children showed a treatment effect to treated words. Three of the five children demonstrated a large effect size for generalization to non-treatment words, with one child demonstrating a moderate effect, and one child demonstrating no effect. However, all children showed qualitative changes to their speech system. Three of the five children experienced significant changes to communicative participation. Measures of treatment fidelity indicated that parents were able to competently deliver the intervention both within the clinic and at home. Conclusions: Combined parent and SLP-delivered multiple oppositions intervention is effective for some children with moderate to severe phonological impairment. The findings indicate that parents can be trained to competently and confidently deliver phonological intervention. Further evidence is needed to identify optimal child and parent characteristics most suited to this modified service delivery approach.

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