Evaluating use of neutral electrolyzed water for cleaning near-patient surfaces

M Stewart, A Bogusz, J Hunter, I Devanny, B Yip, D Reid, Chris Robertson, S J Dancer

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186 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study aimed to monitor the microbiological effect of cleaning near-patient sites over a 48-hour period with a novel disinfectant, electrolyzed water. One ward dedicated to acute care of the elderly population in a district general hospital in Scotland. Lockers, left and right cotsides, and overbed tables in 30 bed spaces were screened for aerobic colony count (ACC), methicillinsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) before cleaning with electrolyzed water. Sites were rescreened at varying intervals from 1 to 48 hours after cleaning. Microbial growth was quantified as colony-forming units (CFUs) per square centimeter and presence or absence of MSSA and MRSA at each site. The study was repeated 3 times at monthly intervals. There was an early and significant reduction in average ACC (360 sampled sites) from a before-cleaning level of 4.3 to 1.65 CFU/cm2 at 1 hour after disinfectant cleaning ( ). P ! .0001 Average counts then increased to 3.53 FU/cm2 at 24 hours and 3.68 CFU/cm2 at 48 hours. Total MSSA/MRSA (34 isolates) decreased by 71% at 4 hours after cleaning but then increased to 155% (53 isolates) of precleaning levels at 24 hours. Cleaning with electrolyzed water reduced ACC and staphylococci on surfaces beside patients. ACC remained below precleaning levels at 48 hours, but MSSA/MRSA counts exceeded original levels at 24 hours after cleaning. Although disinfectant cleaning quickly reduces bioburden,
Original languageEnglish
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Early online date24 Oct 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus aureus
Disinfectants
Stem Cells
Water
District Hospitals
Scotland
Staphylococcus
General Hospitals
Growth
Population

Keywords

  • near-patient site cleaning
  • electrolyzed water
  • infection control
  • MSSA
  • MRSA
  • pathogens

Cite this

Stewart, M ; Bogusz, A ; Hunter, J ; Devanny, I ; Yip, B ; Reid, D ; Robertson, Chris ; Dancer, S J. / Evaluating use of neutral electrolyzed water for cleaning near-patient surfaces. In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. 2014.
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Evaluating use of neutral electrolyzed water for cleaning near-patient surfaces. / Stewart, M; Bogusz, A; Hunter, J; Devanny, I; Yip, B; Reid, D; Robertson, Chris; Dancer, S J.

In: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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