Evaluating the usability of a tablet application to support adults with mild intellectual disabilities during primary care consultations

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Abstract

Patients with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) face significant communication barriers when attending primary care consultations. Yet there is a lack of two-way communication aids available to support them in conveying medical symptoms to General Practitioners (GPs). Based on a multi-stakeholder co-design process including GPs, domain experts, people with mild ID and carers, our previous work developed prototype technology to support people with mild ID in GP consultations. This paper discusses the findings of a usability study performed on the resulting prototype. Five experts in ID/usability, four caregivers, and five GPs participated in cognitive and post-task walkthroughs. They found that the application has the potential to increase communication, reduce time constraints, and overcome diagnostic overshadowing. Nevertheless, the participants also identified accessibility barriers relating to: medical imagery; the abstract nature of certain conditions; the use of adaptive questionnaires; and the overloading of information. Potential solutions to overcome these barriers were also discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 8 May 2021
Event ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2021 -
Duration: 8 May 202113 May 2021
https://chi2021.acm.org/

Conference

Conference ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2021
Abbreviated titleCHI2021
Period8/05/2113/05/21
Internet address

Keywords

  • intellectual disabilities
  • primary health care
  • augmentative and alternative communication
  • accessibility
  • mobile applications
  • human-centered computing
  • accessible technologies

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