Ethical issues in social research: Difficulties encountered gaining access to children in hospital for research

K. Stalker, J. Carpenter, C. Connors, R. Phillips

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper recounts the difficulties experienced when the authors sought access to children in hospital for social research interviews. These were part of a 2-year study, funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, aiming to explore the numbers, circumstances and experiences of children who spend prolonged periods in health care settings. Ethical considerations and adequate protection of children are vital but, the authors argue, wherever possible children themselves should be encouraged to decide whether or not to participate in research. In addition, unnecessarily complex access procedures may adversely affect research outcomes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)377-383
    Number of pages6
    JournalChild: Care, Health and Development
    Volume30
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

    Fingerprint

    Ethics
    Research
    Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
    Interviews
    Delivery of Health Care

    Keywords

    • childcare
    • ethics
    • child health
    • special education
    • disclosure
    • research

    Cite this

    Stalker, K. ; Carpenter, J. ; Connors, C. ; Phillips, R. / Ethical issues in social research: Difficulties encountered gaining access to children in hospital for research. In: Child: Care, Health and Development . 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 377-383.
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    Ethical issues in social research: Difficulties encountered gaining access to children in hospital for research. / Stalker, K.; Carpenter, J.; Connors, C.; Phillips, R.

    In: Child: Care, Health and Development , Vol. 30, No. 4, 2004, p. 377-383.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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